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Author Topic: Getting closer to buying a real planer  (Read 1784 times)

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Offline WDH

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #40 on: December 12, 2019, 08:50:09 AM »
 An important aspect you will quickly learn as you plane a big batch of lumber is how consistently the lumber was rough sawn.  I have planed some for others and much of this wood has been poorly sawn, thick and thin, variable thickness, humps and waves etc.  This poorly sawn inconsistent lumber makes the first pass through a challenge as this is when you overload the cutterhead and bog down the planer.  

My lumber is consistent, and Customsawerís lumber is beautifully consistent.  Makes a huge difference in planing efficiency and wear and tear on the machine.  I will rarely plane other peopleís lumber anymore. 
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Offline Dan_Shade

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #41 on: December 12, 2019, 09:30:28 AM »
I think I was as excited to buy a planer as I was to buy a Sawmill. 

It's a significant purchase to buy one that can handle large volumes of lumber. 

The comment about a dust collector is true too, planers make lots of shavings. 

Buy once, cry once.... 
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Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #42 on: December 12, 2019, 11:55:08 AM »
Interesting thread.
Robert I like your comment about raising then lowering the bed rollers.
I have left mine very low continually.
Mine is a 20" bridgewood spiral head (no longer made but very Taiwanese )which was very wimpy when it came with the 5hp cutterhead motor.
I upgraded to a 10hp 3 phase, but still stalls in a thick wide cut.
Maybe raising my bed rollers a litter higher on the initial pass will help.
Snipe has never been an issue with this machine.
mine is straight spiral, is the byrd helical angled?
Just curious as at my age i am winding down and dont plan to upgrade any of my machinery.
Danny I agree about the thick and thin but then it is all my material so I cant fire the sawyer.
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Offline YellowHammer

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #43 on: December 12, 2019, 01:36:16 PM »
Is the bridgewood similar to the Griz 1033?  

The Byrd heads have a slight spiral, the idea is to shear the wood and have the cutters lead into the wood with less of an impact load, such as seen with straight metal knives.  The problem with that is that with metal knives, there is a certain part of the cutter rotation when there are no knives in the wood, in a momentarily unloaded position, and the electric motor can stay at RPM.  With the Bryrd heads Iíve had, there is always a cutter in the wood, so there is a constant load in the cutter and on the motor.  Thatís why spiral heads seem to drag an electric motor down more, they are always in the wood.

The SCMI head is a second generation design and has an extreme twist spiral, so that there are times in the cutterhead rotation where there are no cutters in the wood, giving the electric motor a chance to maintain RPM, like with straight knives.  

The other problem with the Byrds and Grizz carbide heads Iíve owned is that the shoulder clearance between the edge of the cutter and the main body of the cutter head, the big round hunk of metal the knives are mounted in, is just over 3/16Ē.  So if planing more than that, the board will actually bump into the cutterhead body because of the lack of clearance.  Then the board will feed under, and if the cutter head isnít spring loaded and canít raise up, then extreme loads and and even stalling the motor happens.  For metallic knive the clearance is about 1/4Ē, and if you look closely at some of the specs between the same machine with either spiral or knife configuration, the knives will have a slightly deeper advertised cut.  They simply have more clearance.  

The feed speed plays a tremendous role in stalling and slowing the feed just a little will make a huge difference.

When the carbides gets dull, they really cause a lot more load on the planing.  As a rule of thumb, if the planer is too loud for me to talk nd be heard, then the carbides are dull and slapping the wood, so itís time to rotate them.  




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Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #44 on: December 12, 2019, 10:30:31 PM »
About rotating your cutters, make sure your cutters are dull and not just dirty.  Wood pitch coats the cutters, and makes them cut like they are dull, and if you clean them, can sometimes cut like new edges.  I use some LA Awesome ammonia cleaner I get at Dollar Tree store, dollar a gallon, and scrub with a toothbrush, then rinse with a little water.  Have to put a piece of cardboard under the cutterhead before starting this, but then after rinsing with a little water, use compressed air to dry the cutterhead, then turn on the machine to get the last of the moisture.

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #45 on: December 13, 2019, 01:04:38 AM »
Yes, although I'm planning a dust collection system for the other machines in the shop, for this planer, and my MP100 beam planer, I'm thinking of just using blower motors (dust collection style) to blow the volume of chips outside into my 4x4x8 box.  My only concern with that is planing walnut.  Will fine dust drift towards my horses pen?  That is on the opposite side of the building as the box would be, but the prevailing wind goes in that direction.  The chip box has vent holes around the top perimeter.  I could cover those with filter fabric, but would it be sufficient?  The box is not water proof, so I may need to build a roof on it and paint the sides well. 
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline WDH

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #46 on: December 13, 2019, 07:27:38 AM »
I did a 4x4x8 box too, but it was a pain to dump, so I ditched it.  Now there is no box, just a pile that customers come and get and keep the pile pulled down.  Mine are all just dry planer and jointer shavings, though.  Much easier, but I am in the country and am over a 1/4 mile from anything. 
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Offline doc henderson

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #47 on: December 13, 2019, 07:38:12 AM »
@Brad_bb are you worried about respiratory stuff for your horses?  I have heard that walnut is not good on hooves in a stall.  I know cedar can over time cause respiratory stuff in people.  Had not heard about walnut and respiratory stuff with horses.  @Nebraska . It is good you are really thinking about everything!
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Offline WDH

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #48 on: December 13, 2019, 07:40:54 AM »
It is the juglone in the walnut. 
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Offline Nebraska

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #49 on: December 13, 2019, 07:52:10 AM »
I don't know the distance the dust has to travel to get to them. In theory it could bother them if enough got there. It causes laminitis(sore feet/founder). Initally if the walnut is removed the feet get better, not sure how they will fair with repeat exposures may end up wrecking the pony. I need to come up with a dust management  plan at my house as well.  FYI Best wood for horse stalls is cotton wood it's hard and pretty bitter, horses don't eat it when they are bored as much. That's probably  been said here before I'm sure.  

Offline doc henderson

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #50 on: December 13, 2019, 08:20:33 AM »
nice to have at least two expert opinions.  thanks @Nebraska  &  @WDH  .  @GeneWengert-WoodDoc 
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #51 on: December 13, 2019, 08:42:38 AM »
Planer dust is a total mess.  The best way I can describe it is to take a couple spray cans of bright orange marking paint, tape some M80ís to their sides, put it where your dust collection pipe exit will be, and blow them up.  Thatís where the sawdust is going.  

Iíve tried lots of things to contain the high velocity sawdust coming from the blower exit and the only thing that worked was spinning it out in a open cyclone. Otherwise,  20 yard by 20 yard mess of wind blown sawdust, muddy tracks where I had to get the loader in to scoop and carry it off, and dead and nuked grass where the sawdust acidified the soil and killed everything it landed on.

Here are a couple fails on my part.  


 Hereís me trying to get it into a dump  trailer.  A lot of missing.  Notice all the dead grass and dirt from overspray.  I originally tried to use the trailer like a box, but that didnít work, so I opened up the top and that didnít work well either. I tried putting an open canvas bag on the blower end pipe but that still wasnít any good.  



 
So then I tried going directly into a dump truck, that worked ok but still a total mess.

So I finally ended up with an open cyclone and forklift dump hopper and that works the best I have tried, by far.  My overspray has just about disappeared and the grass is growing back.  Easy to dump and maintain.  





By the way, I had as many as 30 cows and three horses and they never seemed to be bothered by the sawdust, you can see one grazing in the background.  However, I never had them penned up where they got full exposure or had to stand in it for any length of time.  They did gave to walk though it occasionally when I fed them in the corral.  Without doubt, wet sawdust outside is a nasty stinking mess and is to be avoided unless you blow it in a pile away away from everything else.  
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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #52 on: December 13, 2019, 08:50:41 AM »
It has become amazing to me how many docs have chickens.  Your volume may exceed the need.  I get smart sacks and when full I ask around and can at least give it away.  
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #53 on: December 13, 2019, 11:24:30 AM »
photo of my Bridgewood 20" spiral head

 
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Offline WDH

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #54 on: December 13, 2019, 09:24:26 PM »
My planer and jointer shavings fall into a nice pile.  I don't do sawdust from the mill with the blower.  I still drag off the mill sawdust and spread it out with the box blade on the tractor. 
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Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #55 on: December 14, 2019, 01:47:51 AM »
When you plane, besides the nice planer shavings, there is also a fine dust produced.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #56 on: December 14, 2019, 08:23:31 AM »
I do not know anything about respiratory problems and horses.  the heavy chips will fall out, and that can be enhanced by a centrifugal separation. Sounds like your concern is the fine dust that remains suspended and would not have time to be diluted before ending up near the horses.  You also cannot slow the air flow at the end, cause it will slow the entire velocity of the system and you will be clogging things up. sounds like you will need bags or cartages to filter the fine dust.  or put the air exhaust in an area to not affect your ponies.  Maybe a cover to your box, that is like filter fabric, but it will have to be out of the elements.  and the design should be easy to clean. maybe hit it with a stick.  I know there are companies (adds in wood working mags)  that make custom collector bags.  just throwing out ideas.  someone needs to make a machine to compress and bag wood chips.  do you now someone with an old trash truck?  Might be good to estimate your volume and how often you want to empty your bin ect.  best regards Bryan.
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #57 on: December 14, 2019, 09:26:44 AM »
To avoid a variety of liability issues I don't allow the dust or shavings to leave here.I push everything into a canyon and compost it all out. Every few years I load some of the compost into the manure spreader and use it for weed abatement.Water here is precious and the compost helps hold soil moisture.
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Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #58 on: December 14, 2019, 03:24:03 PM »
The local sale barn uses sawdust to put on the floor of their sale ring.  Kind of dusty in the seats there.  There is also a sign in the shack where you pick up your calves, sawdust so much per bag.  Don't know what variety of sawdust it is.

Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Getting closer to buying a real planer
« Reply #59 on: December 15, 2019, 10:30:13 AM »
Here is a pic of my chip wagon.
Made from an old manure spreader
I  haul it up to my waste pile when full and shovel it off.
Takes about an hr all told, but I only have to do it once or twice a year.




 
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Kubota 900 RTV
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1 Husky 1 gas Echo 1 cordless Echo vintage Homelite super xl12
241 acres of woodland


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