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Author Topic: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement  (Read 10177 times)

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Offline Magicman

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2019, 08:39:04 AM »
Construction is 2" x 6" framing (not your big box stuff but real 2" x 6"s)
I would give careful consideration to this.  I agree with using "2X6's" for all of your stud walls, but remember that a common 16d nail is only ~3¼" long.  Not long enough to nail two full 2" sticks together.  Sawing a full 6" wide is OK and I commonly do it, but personally I would saw 1 5/8" thick which will dry to a nominal 1½".

16d is the longest nail that most nailguns will shoot.  Most framers use 12d which are only ~3" long.
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Offline Ed_K

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2019, 08:44:57 AM »
 I wonder about the width of the deck? I built our Lincoln Logs cabin in 85 with 4' wide deck. When it rotted out, in 2004 I rebuilt it to 8'. 7' inside of the railings. With a few chairs and a swing there wasn't room for Rita to get her sister around she has MS and wheelchair bound.
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Offline btulloh

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2019, 08:51:55 AM »
MM brings up a good point.  Fasteners are designed for 1 1/2 thick material, and this is not a trivial issue.  Nail guns won't take the fasteners long enough for full 2" material.  On wall framing in particular, you may run into problems with other things that are designed to work with 3 1/2" or 5 1/2" width framing.  There's no real advantage to wider framing, and you may need to use a stick of store-bought lumber now and then also.  It deserves careful consideration.

One place I like the ability to saw non-standard dimensions is for rafters.  Either for appearance or strength.  

Looking forward to watching your progress.  Good luck with your new home!
HM126

Offline Magicman

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2019, 09:11:40 AM »
Thanks for tickling my reminder button btulloh.  When I have sawn full width 6", 8", 10",etc.  it was for rafters, joist, sills, etc.  All studs have been 3 5/8" & 5 5/8" and yes, if store bought is needed to fill in, it will fit.
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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2019, 09:26:27 AM »
but remember that a common 16d nail is only ~3¼" long.
My Porter Cable takes some longer nails - 3½".   Finally found them at HD.  The box was "damaged" and taped up.  Another, different size, was taped up and discounted 20%.  I pointed out that and the one I wanted that looked the same and the employee gave me the same discount 8)
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Offline Larry

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2019, 09:34:37 AM »
You might consider designing the closet in the master bedroom as a tornado shelter.  FEMA has a excellent free plan book that gives details.  When I built my shelter, I got cost sharing from the state which kept my out of pocket close to zero.

Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

Offline Magicman

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2019, 09:45:34 AM »
Yup, a 12d is supposed to be 3¼" and a 16d is supposed to be 3½".  The 1/8" sharpened tip counts toward the length but has no holding power.  A 20d is 4" long but will not fit into most nailguns. 

My thoughts are that commonly found and readily available fasteners should be a valid concern before sawing lumber and starting a build.  This comes up fairly often before I begin sawing a framing lumber job. While sawing well over a million bf of framing lumber I can recall only two customers that insisted upon full 2" and one of these was matching the existing framing lumber while remodeling an older home.  The other told me that if anyone wanted a full 2" to have them call him before sawing.  :D
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Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #27 on: December 12, 2019, 10:11:59 AM »
Hi all, 
I happened to catch this before I headed out to work on my sawmill house.  I actually measured the 2"x 6"s after Magicman's note...they come in at 1-3/4" x 5-3/4" when dry.  I made a decision early on about what length to cut to because I can haul logs with my grapple that are up to 12' long and 24" in diameter.  (I have to jockey them through the trees on some of my logging roads).  Anything larger and I have to skid them behind the 12 Mexicans.  So all my logs were cut to 12' 4" for initial handling.  After the lumber that has been cut from them is dried, we size them to 12' 0" and grade them for their use.



 

Here is some of the raw lumber drying.



 

With the exception of the pallet of cedar, this is some of the lumber after it has been sized and graded.

I also determined early on to cut all my lumber to 12' lengths because my original cut list had about 20 different lengths and we all know that not all trees that have grown end up making good lumber, especially when you are approaching 16' to 20' lengths.  When the house was designed, this was kept in mind so that everything can be made from 12' lengths with few exceptions and those I will cut special for their intended use.

When it comes to construction technology, I also determined early on based on my experience and shared experiences from my contractor friends that I would prefabricate the home in 12' +/- sections.  The major reason for this decision was the inherent waste that we saw from carpenters using a part of a board and throwing the rest into the scrap pile.  Every contractor I have talked to has had this problem.  For the stud framing, although it is more expensive and time consuming (hey I'm retired I have all the time in the world ;D), I chose to screw the framing together and nail the shiplap onto the frames.  The screws will provide more holding power than normal ring shank 16d nails used in a nail gun.  Framing design has taken into account the modular design so when panels are set in place they are screwed together as well.  The net result is stronger walls than typical "build on the pad" walls.

To accomodate building the walls in sections and the trusses, I designed a setup and construction table I call my "big ass table".  It is 4 - 4' x 12' tables that can be leveled and bound to each other to provide a consistent working surface.  It can be configured in several different ways such as 12' x 12', 12' x 16', 4' x 24', or 8' x 24'.  See the photos below. 



 

This is two of the tables configured for building the 24' wide trusses for my sawmill house.




 
Here are 2 of the tables after building and finishing



 

These hold the tables latched together when using multiple tables.







This is the simple leveling mechanism I used to level the tables because I am using them on a sloped gravel surface under my barn awning.  It gives me up to 3" of leveling ability from end to end.

Hopefully this clarifies some of the details (and probably raises more questions.)

I will try and address all the comments as time warrants, and I really thank all of you for your thoughtful input.
EOTE (End of the Earth - i.e. last place on the road in the middle of nowhere)  Retired.  Old guys rule!
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Offline Raider Bill

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #28 on: December 12, 2019, 10:18:15 AM »
You could do what I did and use common dimension lumber for the frame work but screw everything together with deck screws instead of nailing, then put simpsons on every joint.
Overkill, yep, expensive, check, extra and time consuming sure was but if Tennessee ever gets hit with a hurricane I'm good, maybe.

I also agree with the extra width deck.

One thing about your drawings I noticed it that's a long haul from the wood stove to master suite. How are you going to move the warm air?
The First 60 years of childhood is always the hardest.

Offline Raider Bill

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2019, 10:19:29 AM »
I guess our posts about screwing everything crossed each other in cyberspace.
The First 60 years of childhood is always the hardest.

Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #30 on: December 12, 2019, 10:39:00 AM »
One thing about your drawings I noticed it that's a long haul from the wood stove to master suite. How are you going to move the warm air?


Actually the house will have dual HVAC systems on the second floor, one for the bedrooms, master bathroom, office and 2nd floor space, and one for the general open area of the sunroom, kitchen, living room and utility room.  The wood burning stove is more for enjoyment than for heating the house as it would definitely create challenges with moving the air to the whole house.

One thing I am a big fan of is building POC's (proofs of concept) when it comes to any ideas I have in mind for the house.  I grew up in Montana with wood burning stoves as the main source of heat but my wife is a city girl and likes the conveniences of civilization, thus the HVAC systems and the "decorative" wood stove. 

This is the "POC" of the wood burning stove that I built in the barn for my wife to see and understand the capabilities.  The stove will heat the 2400 square foot barn but it still takes a lot of wood.  We both decided that while nice, it won't be the heat provider, it will be for sitting in front of a nice warm fire on a cold night.  (Quite honestly, I have become accustomed to HVAC systems as well and like their conveniences).  The wall behind it is a POC of stone veneer we are considering for the courtyard walls.



 
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Offline pineywoods

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #31 on: December 12, 2019, 11:10:36 AM »
Some more observations on planning for abnormal situations.. Carpet is a no-no. I learned the hard way that spills and dropped objects (think broken hen eggs) will happen more frequently as we get older. I ripped out ALL the carpet and replaced with ceramic tile and vinyl planks. Almost zero maintenance. We have one of them so-called robot vacuum cleaners that does an acceptable job on stuff that the wife's wheel chair tracks in from outside. X2 on the pocket doors. Opening a conventional door from a wheelchair is a pain. drive up to the door, open until door hits chair..back up, open door further,,,repeat up to 3 times..Ramps...Just say no if possible..otherwise keep them small as possible. Going down a ramp is a snap, up requires the arms of a weight lifter unless you have a slave to push..
On the subject of wheel chairs.. we have 20 years of experience on every kind of mobility device known to man. Glad to share..
Heating...We have a wood stove with propane furnace backup. Stove sits on a ceramic tile floor and is about a foot from an internal brick wall.  Think thermal mass. A ceiling fan overhead blowing downward  Keeps things toasty long after the fire has burned out..
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Online thecfarm

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #32 on: December 12, 2019, 11:17:51 AM »
pineywood is right on with the carpets and ceiling fans. Summer time I can bring that cool air into the house and listen to the wife about how cold it is. :o 
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Offline Raider Bill

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #33 on: December 12, 2019, 12:10:17 PM »
I took carpet out of everything I own including the rentals. Tile everywhere. Hard to hurt it.
In my house small area/throw rugs for accent that I can drag outside and hit with the hose when needing a cleaning.
The First 60 years of childhood is always the hardest.

Offline Darrel

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #34 on: December 12, 2019, 12:45:57 PM »
As a rehab nurse, I learned that carpet & rugs are a trip hazard. As a senior citizen, my wife and I are learning it first hand. We have removed all carpet from our abode and when the new house is built, it will have wood floors. 
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Offline Raider Bill

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #35 on: December 12, 2019, 01:42:46 PM »
As a rehab nurse, I learned that carpet & rugs are a trip hazard. As a senior citizen, my wife and I are learning it first hand. We have removed all carpet from our abode and when the new house is built, it will have wood floors.
And all of a sudden we are senior citizens. When did that happen then I do something stupid while acting like I'm in my 20's or 30's and remember.
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The First 60 years of childhood is always the hardest.

Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #36 on: December 12, 2019, 05:12:25 PM »
And all of a sudden we are senior citizens. When did that happen then I do something stupid while acting like I'm in my 20's or 30's and remember.


I resemble that!
EOTE (End of the Earth - i.e. last place on the road in the middle of nowhere)  Retired.  Old guys rule!
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Offline Don P

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #37 on: December 12, 2019, 07:51:16 PM »
Just more stuff to think about or you maybe already have.

We did mudsill and joists today on a small house, yellow poplar and red oak 11-1/4" x 1-1/2", sawed, dried, planed and ripped to final nominal dimension. We're using nailguns, watch the nail guage as well, diameter, depth and density of the wood are the keys there. Screws for framing are  a no-no unless they are structural screws, look for an "ESR" number on the box otherwise they are likely too brittle for structural use. We always want ductile failures (squeal, distort) rather than brittle (snap, whump). For proof of concept drive a nail and a screw in halfway and whack them back and forth with a hammer, most screws snap, no good. Many screws are good in withdrawal but worthless in shear.



The black screw there is structural, that took considerable force to do that. The other screws are clearly inferior, nevertheless look at that ductile nail.

When this round of weather passes I have the 1x6 and 8" floor sheathing on my trailer on site for that and for the walls that will be applied diagonally to triangularize the frame. Many people have forgotten that necessity to properly brace the framing. The roof will be skip sheathed perpendicular to the rafters, the metal forms a diaphragm of bracing if well screwed, those screws are rated for that thanks to the post frame folks.

This has some good design stuff to review;
https://www.huduser.gov/publications/pdf/remodel.pdf
In kitchen and bath I usually ring the walls with let in 2x6 or 8 at grab rail height in the framing rather than just blocking nailed between studs, big boy bars :D.

I was in my 20's when we built this peter pan house, I'll never grow old. DanG something happened along the way :D. I need to put a master and full bath downstairs.
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Offline tule peak timber

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #38 on: December 12, 2019, 08:48:13 PM »
Man I don't know what you did to the black Timber-loc in the middle of the photo ---I've never busted one, Yikes !
   We are debating build our third "forever home" I'm running out of gas...... :o
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Offline Don P

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2019, 09:28:32 PM »
Wha, I was just pulling up a leaning 2 story house with it in a 90 :D
But yeah, normal structural steel  like for I beams and such is 36 or 50,000 lb tensile, those things are 90ksi steel.
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