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Author Topic: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement  (Read 10170 times)

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Offline Sedgehammer

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #200 on: July 01, 2020, 02:11:15 PM »
We have family near dripping springs Tx.  they could not even modify a natural spring fed swimming hole without formal eval and permission.  there water smelled of sulfur.  they barely noticed, but it was all we could do to shower there.  some sort of sulfur fixing bacteria.  the fix was to add bicarb to the water to raise the pH.  too expensive for them as they were used to it.  it affected the well, but not noticed in the spring.  They had a lot of moss, and we talked about a rake to clean it, but he said if folks down stream noticed a change in water clarity, there would be an investigation.
Yeah, that's a naturally occurring water flow. Just as a rule, Texas isn't as anal as blue states. 

Offline Walnut Beast

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #201 on: July 01, 2020, 02:43:15 PM »
K. Question though, why? I know rain H2O is better for plants overall, so for garden stuff I can see it, but still it can't be justified over well water for costs involved. I don't know what wells cost there, but you mentioned high H2O table. Is it brackish water?
Your place, so of course do want you desire. We drilled a 60 gpm well for irrigating and keeping our pond full. $4,800 for the well. Another 2k for wire, pump n related. Glad we did, really nice to swim in nice clear H2O. For just household, lawn n garden, that'd be about 1/2 that cost.
many places water is in short supply/high demand and highly regulated.  I assume it is for conservation and or getting around some regulation


When we originally designed and built the barn, we found two existing wells on the property, both damaged when they bulldozed a clearing for selling the property.  When we looked into remediation or drilling a new well, the starting price was around $7,500.  When I looked at rainwater collection, the biggest expense was the tanks.  My total cost for the plumbing, tanks, and a very reliable water purification system was only $7,000.  Plus, we get an average of 48" of rain per year which equates to 76,800 gallons of rainwater that we could potentially collect.  The well option also was not encouraging from the neighbor's point of view.  He has two wells that are 200+ feet deep and produce hard mineral laden water which he has to run through the appropriate filters (high iron content) and he only gets about 5 gpm per well.

After we got the system installed, we had the water tested for 189 different contaminants, minerals, etc.  It was almost like distilled water.  There is no smell or taste or mineral deposits in the shower. :)

Texas is one state that actually encourages rainwater collection.  I know some states jealously guard that "right" and don't allow individuals to collect rainwater.  Since we had that option, for us it became an economic decision.  

My total maintenance costs are a pre and post filter every quarter and a UV replacement light once a year.  I also "slam" the tanks with a gallon of bleach every 6 months.  I have to keep the downspouts clean of leaves and debris but I have 2 screen filters before the tanks which are mosquito proof so they catch a lot of the finer debris.  You can look in the tanks after 3 years and still see the bottom although there are traces of debris that you can see as well.

For us, it was a good choice.
How about your alternative electricity 😳

Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #202 on: July 01, 2020, 03:07:20 PM »
K. Question though, why? I know rain H2O is better for plants overall, so for garden stuff I can see it, but still it can't be justified over well water for costs involved. I don't know what wells cost there, but you mentioned high H2O table. Is it brackish water?
Your place, so of course do want you desire. We drilled a 60 gpm well for irrigating and keeping our pond full. $4,800 for the well. Another 2k for wire, pump n related. Glad we did, really nice to swim in nice clear H2O. For just household, lawn n garden, that'd be about 1/2 that cost.
many places water is in short supply/high demand and highly regulated.  I assume it is for conservation and or getting around some regulation


When we originally designed and built the barn, we found two existing wells on the property, both damaged when they bulldozed a clearing for selling the property.  When we looked into remediation or drilling a new well, the starting price was around $7,500.  When I looked at rainwater collection, the biggest expense was the tanks.  My total cost for the plumbing, tanks, and a very reliable water purification system was only $7,000.  Plus, we get an average of 48" of rain per year which equates to 76,800 gallons of rainwater that we could potentially collect.  The well option also was not encouraging from the neighbor's point of view.  He has two wells that are 200+ feet deep and produce hard mineral laden water which he has to run through the appropriate filters (high iron content) and he only gets about 5 gpm per well.

After we got the system installed, we had the water tested for 189 different contaminants, minerals, etc.  It was almost like distilled water.  There is no smell or taste or mineral deposits in the shower. :)

Texas is one state that actually encourages rainwater collection.  I know some states jealously guard that "right" and don't allow individuals to collect rainwater.  Since we had that option, for us it became an economic decision.  

My total maintenance costs are a pre and post filter every quarter and a UV replacement light once a year.  I also "slam" the tanks with a gallon of bleach every 6 months.  I have to keep the downspouts clean of leaves and debris but I have 2 screen filters before the tanks which are mosquito proof so they catch a lot of the finer debris.  You can look in the tanks after 3 years and still see the bottom although there are traces of debris that you can see as well.

For us, it was a good choice.
How about your alternative electricity 😳
With the amount of electricity I use and the pricing down here, it doesn't pay to go off grid and use solar.  I have a back up generator for when the power fails (which is several times a year).  Consider the draw when running a 5 hp. 240v saw and planer and a 1 hp. power feeder and dust collection system.  Couple that with all the fans I run during the summer to stay cool...solar is just not economically feasible.
I did an ROI on solar power when we first bought the place and it wouldn't break even until well after 30 years and that was assuming the solar panels would last that long.  
Wind is not an option because we are in a hollow.  Average wind speed is about 2 mph.
EOTE (End of the Earth - i.e. last place on the road in the middle of nowhere)  Retired.  Old guys rule!
Buzz Lightsaw, 12 Mexicans, and lots of Guy Toys

Offline Ed_K

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #203 on: July 02, 2020, 03:21:21 PM »
 How right you are about blue states >:(.
Ed K

Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #204 on: July 02, 2020, 09:59:30 PM »
Where I live in Kansas, we have well water with sulfur.  I took some well water to be tested, and they said, not fit for human consumption.  Livestock are allowed to drink it, but I give the cows water from the rural water system, most of the time they drink from ponds.  About 5 miles west, the city has their water wells, they are good, and say it is the edge of the ogalalah aquafier.   Trouble is, they add so much chemical the water tastes bad.  So I have a reverse osmosis at the house for drinking water.

Offline Sedgehammer

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #205 on: July 02, 2020, 10:05:25 PM »
I lived in western Kansas (Syracuse area) fir a few years. There were places with good water and  places with bad water. It could be right across the road. Weird.

Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k I .a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #206 on: July 03, 2020, 09:23:32 PM »
EOTE, I thought you were one of those lucky guys who had not screwed up your back when you were younger.  Guess I was wrong.  Think ALL of us who actually accomplish something in this life have a bad back. My inversion device does give me some relief.  Can't go to the chiropractor every day. I TRY to not over do my lifting, but it is difficult to avoid.  Skid steer and thinking has helped a lot.

Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k I .a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #207 on: July 04, 2020, 12:09:22 AM »
EOTE, I thought you were one of those lucky guys who had not screwed up your back when you were younger.  Guess I was wrong.  Think ALL of us who actually accomplish something in this life have a bad back. My inversion device does give me some relief.  Can't go to the chiropractor every day. I TRY to not over do my lifting, but it is difficult to avoid.  Skid steer and thinking has helped a lot.
I guess I am really going to have to look into one of those inversion devices...If it really works, I will have to try it.  I wonder if any gyms have them to try?  I see 'em on the Big "A" but how do you know which one is good?  Some of them look more suited for waterboarding. :)
EOTE (End of the Earth - i.e. last place on the road in the middle of nowhere)  Retired.  Old guys rule!
Buzz Lightsaw, 12 Mexicans, and lots of Guy Toys

Offline Hilltop366

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #208 on: July 04, 2020, 07:51:45 AM »
Could DIY a inversion table? Door hinges a wide plank, couple of pieces of 2x4 and a tall saw horse.... what could go wrong? ;D

I suppose it could end up on the "Did something dumb today" thread.

Offline doc henderson

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #209 on: July 04, 2020, 08:56:36 AM »
I have been lucky.  I did lots of dumb stuff when I was young and sports, and developed a strong back.  But have not done so much as I get older that I have worn it out.  lots of stretches and back strengthening exercises on line.  there are muscles to strengthen, and ligaments to strech.  but if the disc is squished and the nerve impinged (pain somewhere other than back like down the leg)  the stretching will not help.  the inversion is supposed to take the constant weight off the disc, and let it rehydrate and thicken back up, and take pressure of the nerve.  working the core muscles, and lifting smart once you have troubles is prob. smart.  a good steady work habit without periods of overuse or no use.  
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Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #210 on: July 04, 2020, 11:54:45 AM »
When I first was having trouble with my back, stopped by the plumbers place, he had some "boots" you clamped on your lower legs, and they had hooks.  He had a pipe mounted across his doorway, and you grabbed the pipe, swung up and hooked the boots on the pipe, then let go and hung, he said for not over 30 seconds, as the blood goes to your head.  Really helped the back that time, so I would stop by and use his boots and bar occasionally.  Then there was this Damark catalog that started showing up, and they had this table contraption, with clamps for your feet.  I ordered one.  And it sits in the basement where I go and hang occasionally.

Offline doc henderson

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #211 on: July 04, 2020, 12:15:00 PM »
it is one thing to get up there all upside down.  I wonder how many fire calls there are to help get people down, or after they fall on their head.  :o :o :o :) I had a boss with that in the a doorway back in the 80s.
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

Offline Raider Bill

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #212 on: July 04, 2020, 12:50:38 PM »
I tried that but found that it was too much strain on my body.
I only tilt to a little over 130 degrees and no more than 12 minutes.
Worse part about tilting is you can't really do much. I find it hard to watch TV or read upside down but my dog sure does like to lick my face while I'm vulnerable.
Tilting doesn't work for everyone and it takes a bit of getting used to but it works well for me.
The draw back is it's a big price of equipment so you need a place to set it up.
I bought my table on Amazon for $199. Has a 400 pound weight limit.
The First 60 years of childhood is always the hardest.

Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #213 on: July 04, 2020, 06:00:13 PM »
I bought my table on Amazon for $199. Has a 400 pound weight limit.


I guess it would support me twice. :)  Do you mind sharing what brand/model you ended up with?
EOTE (End of the Earth - i.e. last place on the road in the middle of nowhere)  Retired.  Old guys rule!
Buzz Lightsaw, 12 Mexicans, and lots of Guy Toys

Offline WDH

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #214 on: July 04, 2020, 08:27:13 PM »
you grabbed the pipe, swung up and hooked the boots on the pipe, then let go and hung,
Reminds me of Grandpa on the Munsters.
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Offline Raider Bill

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #215 on: July 05, 2020, 11:07:16 AM »
I bought my table on Amazon for $199. Has a 400 pound weight limit.


I guess it would support me twice. :)  Do you mind sharing what brand/model you ended up with?
It's the Ironman gravity. Looks like the price went down $20. Since 2014
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Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #216 on: July 05, 2020, 02:18:17 PM »
That is nicer than the old one I have.  I always find things on amazon, then search the item, and find it from another seller for less.

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #217 on: July 05, 2020, 02:28:23 PM »
It's pretty basic. Just clamp and flip.
I thought it had a 400 lb weight limit but looks like it's only 350. I better start watching my weight.
The First 60 years of childhood is always the hardest.

Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #218 on: July 05, 2020, 09:26:13 PM »
This weekend we stubbed out all the rainwater collection plumbing for the house.  It was fairly simple; 6 - downspout stubs, 4 - exterior water spigots (one on each side of the house), and the associated collection piping.  The tanks have not been chosen but the site for the storage tanks has been (about 50' from the house).  We did not extend the plumbing to the tank area and won't until we are ready to connect the tanks.



 



 

The collection system is split to provide an even distribution of collection load (one half of the roof on each half of the system).
The water distribution system is 1" PVC and provides a single outlet on each side of the house.  We will place a pump, filter system, and pressure tank down by the storage tanks.  Probably something in the neighborhood of a 3/4 hp. pump like we are using in the barn for the potable water system.  We are looking at 4 - 3 to 4 thousand gallon tanks for non-potable storage.



 
EOTE (End of the Earth - i.e. last place on the road in the middle of nowhere)  Retired.  Old guys rule!
Buzz Lightsaw, 12 Mexicans, and lots of Guy Toys

Offline EOTE

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Re: Building our Dream Home a.k.a. Delusions of Retirement
« Reply #219 on: July 08, 2020, 08:08:19 AM »
We had 4" of rain over the last 2 days so not much opportunity to backfill around the home site.  So I finished another pallet of T&G and made a concrete tube and cover for the septic system.  Late last evening I was able to pull the tape off the trench drain in the courtyard and remove the covers to clean up all the concrete that washed into the drain during the pour. (The drain was covered with tape but because it rained when they poured the water settled above the trench drain.  We had to cut slits in the tape to let the water out through the drain.)





I used flexible landscape edging to create the form as no sonotube the sizes I needed was available.  The inside diameter is 16" and the thickness is 2"

 



The cement trucks crushed the ends of the culvert on my road around the barn so I have to replace that culvert and widen the turning radius of the road with more gravel.  Because it is so wet I am going to make 2 gravel runs this week.
EOTE (End of the Earth - i.e. last place on the road in the middle of nowhere)  Retired.  Old guys rule!
Buzz Lightsaw, 12 Mexicans, and lots of Guy Toys


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