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Author Topic: King Post Restoration  (Read 155 times)

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Offline EPops

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King Post Restoration
« on: May 22, 2020, 08:13:33 PM »
Hello fellow timber framers.

I would like to ask opinions on restoring the Tie Beam/Rafter connection in the below frame.  I have some good ideas but am looking for other ideas as well.

There are double king post trusses (one king post stacked on another).



 

Top Chord (Rafter) frames into the Lower Chord (Tie beam).  I believe it is a simple birdsmouth.  Where the rafter birdsmouth sits on top of the tie beam.  The connection goes into and bears on a brick wall, so it is hard to see the exact details of the connection.

My question is: depending on the amount of rot at each connection, how would you repair or replace the connections, even going so far as to replace the rafters or beams themselves?  How much rot (in terms of depth, overall section loss, etc.) constitutes repair or replacement?

In my first opinion, I would think to cut out the rotted sections.  How far back would you cut out the rotted portions?

Then, a scarf joint or splice joint can be used.  Would you agree?  And also, which kinds of joints would you use?

There is most likely no damage to the beams at midspan.  Also assume no damage to any other members, including the upper king post.

Lastly, if repair needs to happen, how would you jack or crib the structure to be able to cut out and replace with a new joint?

Thanks!

Offline Don P

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Re: King Post Restoration
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2020, 09:44:01 PM »
Hi EPops

Interesting frame. It screams "Get an Engineer!" this appears to be a large commercial building, liability carries the day.

I'm assuming the center row of posts under that is load bearing, if so this isn't really a kingpost truss. If what I'm describing is correct this act quite differently than a kingpost truss and that is definitely in your favor if the heeljoints are in trouble. So I guess start there, is the post and beam row under the "trusses" load bearing and is it in line under the kingposts? Can you post a clear photo showing all the joinery possible at the compromised heeljoint? Is the tie beam spliced or continuous? If spliced get a pic of the splice.
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline EPops

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Re: King Post Restoration
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2020, 09:49:55 PM »
Don - thanks for adding in some advice.  Yes, we'll certainly need an engineer for this one.

Yes, those center posts are load bearing.  That center beam is basically in the same plane as the truss tie beams.  Looks like it is there to have some lateral support down the longitudinal axis.  Those trusses are certainly unique.

I'm actually just working off of pictures right now.  Heading to the site tomorrow to check it out and I'll get back to you with more detailed photos on the heeljoints.

I think the tie beams might be spliced, or otherwise not continuous.

Appreciate the guidance and I'll check in again tomorrow.

Offline Don P

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Re: King Post Restoration
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2020, 10:25:45 PM »
@EPops
Hopefully this will ping you before you head out. I'm guessing you'll be there with your design team. Some things to think about and chew on while you all are looking it over. If it is designed to act as a truss the heeljoints and bottom chords will be designed to resist significant tension. The joinery will reflect that.

What I suspect though is that the post and beam row is supporting the kingpost(s) and then the top chords are designed to hang from that central support. The kings will then be under and propping the top chords in compression rather than hanging from them in tension. The top chords will be resting on the tie beams at the heeljoint rather than being very rigidly connected to them to resist thrust. The tie beam splice will not need to be as robust.

I'm not trying to drive your thoughts just another thing to think about as you look it over.
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart


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