The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts





Author Topic: Mould on pine timber  (Read 454 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline JoshNZ

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Mould on pine timber
« on: June 28, 2020, 01:59:41 AM »
I have some fresh sawn slabs from an Oldman pine log I picked up and have this white spore like mould growing on it several days later.

It is wood I'd like to use at some stage, am I best to remove it or spray down with something or just ignore?

Thanks!

 

Offline Ianab

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13941
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Stratford , New Zealand
  • Gender: Male
  • Marmite on toast is a real breakfast
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2020, 03:39:58 AM »
You can spray the mold with dilute bleach to kill it. Then get some fans or more airflow happening. Once you can get at least the surface layer dry mold wont grow any more. And unlike some hardwoods, you can't really dry pine too fast. 
Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline moodnacreek

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1952
  • Location: Orange County NY
  • Gender: Male
  • Sawin by the notches
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2020, 08:56:34 AM »
Pine and warm weather don't mix. Any pine I cut from May to September has to be sprayed, to much extra work. A lot of members think blue stain is cute but my customers don't.

Offline slider

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1602
  • Age: 70
  • Location: south georgia
  • Gender: Male
  • sawyer,trucker,tree service
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2020, 01:45:48 PM »
i use  to spray ,now i sticker it and use fans.
al glenn

Offline Ianab

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13941
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Stratford , New Zealand
  • Gender: Male
  • Marmite on toast is a real breakfast
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2020, 03:17:39 PM »
Pine and warm weather don't mix. Any pine I cut from May to September has to be sprayed, to much extra work. A lot of members think blue stain is cute but my customers don't.
Its winter here in NZ, but not cold enough to stop mold growing, and humidity is usually even higher. Summer seems easier here, if you can get the airflow, because it starts drying sooner. We have about 10C, rain and humidity ~90%. 
Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline moodnacreek

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1952
  • Location: Orange County NY
  • Gender: Male
  • Sawin by the notches
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2020, 09:59:17 PM »
The traditional pine cutting season in the northern U.S. is October to March. This seams to be changing as our winters are getting shorter. So those of us up north need to pay attention to the southern states and Australia and New Zealand as they would not have the cold weather to saw and dry pine and other stain prone species. When I was younger I thought once you learned that was it. I never thought things would change so much in my life time.

Offline JoshNZ

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2020, 02:09:57 AM »
I should've waited for a dry spell in the weather but we're having a bit of a crap winter as NZ usually produces, lots of rain these last couple of weeks.

I think I cut the logs on a grey day and was rushing to put them in the shed in the rain. I got sick after that and left them a week so it's not surprising. It was more a test for the mill after reassembly, I don't have much desire to keep pine I was cutting flitches to take thin boards from for a friend then decided to leave them as flitches. Got dreaming about some heavy slab bars.
How long should 150mm pine beams be left before using? Does anyone have any experience building with green timber? I'm planning huge mortise and tenon + peg joints, heavy enough that would prevent twisting anyway.

I scraped and sprayed them down with sodium hypochlorite today. Left a patch of mould to monitor it's efficacy.

Offline Ianab

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13941
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Stratford , New Zealand
  • Gender: Male
  • Marmite on toast is a real breakfast
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2020, 04:47:03 AM »
I scraped and sprayed them down with sodium hypochlorite today. Left a patch of mould to monitor it's efficacy


Bleach should knock back that mold, but you need to get it dry to stop it coming back. 

Very different climate here in NZ compared to most of the US. Mostly alternates between warm and humid, to cool and humid. :D
Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline JoshNZ

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2020, 03:21:29 AM »
I hadn't even really noticed the blue mold. The white stuff peels off, smells like mushrooms, seems harmless. How deep does the blue mould stain? It's quite covered on a couple of the slabs.

Might have to mix a stronger brew of bleach I don't think my first one did much

Offline Ianab

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13941
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Stratford , New Zealand
  • Gender: Male
  • Marmite on toast is a real breakfast
    • Share Post
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2020, 03:42:36 AM »
Smells like mushrooms? Probably a sort of fungus then. Bleach might not kill it as easily as mold. The "blue stain" is another type of fungus which will grow all through the sapwood of pine and feed off the sugars it finds. It basically the first stage of the wood starting to rot, and it doesn't really affect the structure of the wood, just the colour. 

Once you get the wood dried down below about 20% none of those molds or fungus can grow any more. 
Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6905
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2020, 07:25:48 AM »
That's what I was wondering, I suspect the white is the fruiting body of white rot that was already present in the log, one of the decay fungi. Was this log dead or down for some time prior to sawing?
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline GeneWengert-WoodDoc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2965
  • Location: Bishop, GA
  • Gender: Male
  • Author of "Sawing Hardwood Lumber"
    • Share Post
    • Book on Sawing hardwood Lumber
Re: Mould on pine timber
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2020, 08:33:36 AM »
Technical review.  

Fungi need four environmental conditions to be active...
  *. Oxygen
  *. Warmth 50 F to 100 F, with 90 F being ideal
  *. Water , but too much water eliminates oxygen and fast drying really helps
  *. Food (Different fungi need different for.  Blue stain or sap stain fungi like the sugars in the sap; decay fungi like a component of the wood so weaken the wood; mold and mildew do not like wood, but use microorganisms, dirt, etc, on the surface of the wood for food.)

Eliminate one of the four to stop fungal activity.  If we cannot eliminate, then poison the food and use a commercial chemical that provides protection for a few weeks.  The chemical does not carry over to the ultimate consumer, but gives protection until enough water has been evaporated that the fungi can no longer be active.  The chemical provides a barrier to prevent entry of the fungi into the untreated inside wood.    Such chemicals are usually applied immediately after sawing by dipping the entire piece of lumber in the solution.  A few places dip the stacked lumber pile.  The chemicals are quite safe for this use, using common sense protections and drip pads.  In past decades, the solution was also sprayed, but with slight wind, the environment gets covered too.  Spray is no longer used safely.  Such chemicals do not always control mold and mildew, as the chemical does not poison their food.

Note that slight blue stain is not a grading defect for structural wood, but may be an issue for appearance lumber.  Most commercial sawmills use fast drying to control fungi.  They cannot afford to shut down when the weather is real warm, so then poisons are used.
Gene - Author of articles in Sawmill & Woodlot and books: Drying Hardwood Lumber; VA Tech Solar Kiln; Sawing Edging & Trimming Hardwood Lumber. And more


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Ponderosa Pine in Timber Framing

Started by mspeed on Timber Framing/Log construction

10 Replies
2523 Views
Last post March 24, 2018, 11:18:38 AM
by Dakota
xx
timber frame, green or dry, pine or oak!

Started by pineburr on Sawmills and Milling

15 Replies
5531 Views
Last post April 30, 2002, 07:13:57 AM
by ARKANSAWYER
xx
Trying to find timber strength values on red pine

Started by Kelvin on Sawmills and Milling

1 Replies
1275 Views
Last post October 12, 2004, 11:52:43 PM
by beenthere
xx
Monterey or Radiata Pine for timber framing?

Started by giles on Timber Framing/Log construction

12 Replies
3450 Views
Last post November 04, 2012, 01:21:23 AM
by Meadows Miller
 


Powered by EzPortal