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Author Topic: Beam Saw  (Read 1759 times)

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Offline Bindian

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Beam Saw
« on: October 09, 2020, 02:26:52 AM »
I bought me a 16-5/16 in. Magnesium Super SAWSQUATCH (SS) Worm Drive Saw. 16-5/16 In. Magnesium Super SAWSQUATCH? Worm Drive Saw

It was back ordered for November 9th.  It showed up today.  

Now, I found a 16 in. Worm Drive SAWSQUTCH Carpentry Chainsaw. 16 In. Worm Drive SAWSQUATCH? Carpentry Chainsaw

It weighs 18 pounds, where the SS weighs 27 pounds and is way huge and kinda bulky awkward looking.  

I will be cutting 6 inch cants and I am thinking now I should return the SS and get the 16 in. chainsaw.

Has anyone used these saws?  I really would like some input from Y'all.
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

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Offline zinc oxide

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2020, 05:44:07 AM »
Good morning and Holy cow!

Thank you, I didn't even know the company made a beam saw. What I don't know would fill several libraries at Alexandria.

 A complete neophyte to timber framing, but I feel that 90% of a 'professional' result in any endeavor is having the proper tool, the other 10% is learning/knowing how to use it.

 'found money' So I got the 16 5/16 circular saw in question, after some cursory research.

Finally got a chance to play@#%! Sorry, I meant to say... work with it.  I had never run a hypoid drive saw, (I think that's what it's called) of any size, Slightly different than what I was use to feeling with the standard circular saw, direct drive.

 2, 3, 4, and one five and 1/2" by 16-18" cherry, and a few red oak of the same basic dimensions, 3 1/2 inches being the largest oak.

Having nothing to compare it to, I was very happy with the cut quality and the general 'feel' of the tool. I didn't find any 'quick start' guides in the box, figured it was a circular saw. I did reference several of the 'native West Virginian' directions, (pictures) and safety symbols, there is somewhat of a 'kick' on startup even when the table is resting on the cutting surface. Must have some kind of mechanical/centrifugal braking system, blade stopped really quick when you release the trigger, so I didn't have to deal with the gyroscope effect that I read about somewhere.

It felt the best in my hands with the auxiliary handle in the lower hole near the front of the table. I don't know how to describe it, but it cuts at one speed regardless of the thickness of the board to my sense of feel/hearing, partially rotten wood being the only impediment Slightly 'gummy' feeling/sawdust discharge. Some idiot left the crotch on the cherry facing up after he rolled it up the hill and put it up on cribbing, two years before he got a sawmill Three years ago.

I think the list price is around $90 for a replacement OEM 32 tooth blade, but I found a tool store extraordinaire in Columbiana Ohio who beats the prices of Internet, and through hearsay, a renowned sharpening service less than 30 miles from my location.

I very seldom 'freehand' anything, almost always use a straight edge of some sort. Not a carpenter, or anything really, LOL But I am drawn to straight, square, level and plumb. Can't say that I ever achieved it, but the concepts are appealing.

Also stacked two 3" of each species for a single cut, didn't really notice any difference, hence the reference to it cutting at one speed, can't adequately describe it. VERY Smooth cutting/feeling.

The clip-on plastic base seemed suspect/cheap at first blush, but I now feel was a master stroke of  design/engineering. Very handy to have nearby to rest the tool in securely, Can't rust. everything seems quite well-made and heavy-duty, including the base.

 Thanks again for turning me onto the beam saw, gonna have to look for some more money. God willing, I will have a chicken coop before I depart this earth.  always wanted to be a farmer You know the old saw 'Outstanding in your field'.

Previous bad experience with chickens, didn't know any better.

I thought I had planted them too deep, or too close together.   




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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2020, 08:07:06 AM »
That is a huge weight difference.  I believe that @tule peak timber has some experience with a Carpentry Chainsaw.
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Offline tule peak timber

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2020, 09:33:41 AM »
My experience with a beam saw ! LOL

 
persistence personified - never let up , never let down

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2020, 11:38:46 AM »
 Not quit as a bad as a picture of "toes" but getting close.    :o

Offline tule peak timber

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2020, 01:37:37 PM »
Kick back from the new beam saw. Case in point is plan your cut BEFORE you start. Rob
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Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2020, 03:15:24 PM »
That is a huge weight difference.  I believe that @tule peak timber has some experience with a Carpentry Chainsaw.
That weight in motion, via kickback, is what I am concerned about.  The Carpentry Chainsaw seems that it would be more versatile, being able to cut more options, like 45 degrees thru 8 & 3/4 inch thick.
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

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Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2020, 03:20:21 PM »
My experience with a beam saw ! LOL
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Did the Super SAWSQUATCH do that, or the Carpentry Chainsaw??  How fast does the blade or chain stop when you release the switch?
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

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Online Don P

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2020, 07:10:50 PM »
A lot depends on the quality of cut needed. I have the older school stuff, a Makita 16" circle saw and a Milwaukee wormdrive with a Prazi beam chainsaw attachment. I'll grab the Makita if it'll make the cut and only use the Prazi if I have to, its a much coarser finish. I guess one advantage of the big Makita is it doesn't have the power to kick that hard.
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Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2020, 11:50:24 PM »
A lot depends on the quality of cut needed. I have the older school stuff, a Makita 16" circle saw and a Milwaukee wormdrive with a Prazi beam chainsaw attachment. I'll grab the Makita if it'll make the cut and only use the Prazi if I have to, its a much coarser finish. I guess one advantage of the big Makita is it doesn't have the power to kick that hard.
Thanks Don.  I do want a finish cut on it.  I will just be cutting the ends of 6x6 cants square.  So guess I got the right saw after all.  I will feel better about it when I make a few cuts.  Still reading the manual right now.
          hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

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Offline Edvantage

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2020, 05:29:04 AM »
I was debating the sawsquatch saw. I ended up bolting 2 pieces saluminum angle to the bar on my milwaukee cordless chainsaw. It works awesome. Used a 12" speed square clamped to workpiece for guide.  

 

Online Old Greenhorn

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2020, 06:27:25 AM »
A lot depends on the quality of cut needed. I have the older school stuff, a Makita 16" circle saw and a Milwaukee wormdrive with a Prazi beam chainsaw attachment. I'll grab the Makita if it'll make the cut and only use the Prazi if I have to, its a much coarser finish. I guess one advantage of the big Makita is it doesn't have the power to kick that hard.
Thanks Don.  I do want a finish cut on it.  I will just be cutting the ends of 6x6 cants square.  So guess I got the right saw after all.  I will feel better about it when I make a few cuts.  Still reading the manual right now.
          hugs,  Brandi
I borrowed a friends Makita/16 to cut a bunch of 6x8's in Maple and RO and I have to say it left a beautiful surface. I'd love to have one of those.
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Offline tule peak timber

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2020, 08:31:56 AM »
I was debating the sawsquatch saw. I ended up bolting 2 pieces saluminum angle to the bar on my milwaukee cordless chainsaw. It works awesome. Used a 12" speed square clamped to workpiece for guide.  
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

A lot of love in that build. Nice pic !
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Offline Tom King

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2020, 03:25:21 PM »
After having a Makita for over 35 years, I finally found a blade for it that I like.  The Oshlun blade is not so terribly expensive, and cuts like the highest quality blade on a good cabinet saw.  I forget what it cost, but Google 16-5/16" Oshlun blade.

I made compound cuts with it that were not only straight, and the perfect angle, but the cut surface looked like it had been planed. That was without any kind of guide, but I've made millions of cuts with regular circular saws.

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2020, 05:26:28 PM »
Tom, On that Oshlun blade, did you get the 32 or 60 tooth blade?
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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2020, 07:32:55 PM »
I'll have to look.  It's been several years since I've used it.  I'll let you know in a day or so-don't know if I'll be going to that shop tomorrow.

Offline YellowHammer

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #16 on: October 10, 2020, 08:19:44 PM »
Thats pretty coincidental, I prefer the Oshlun blades myself for my straight line rip saw, and get them off Amazon.  I've tried several different brands and styles, but the best I've used so far are these, even better than the stock blade that came with the saw, and the Oshlun's are less than half the price of the others.

Here's the one I took off yesterday, its been run a little too long, and this was its third sharpening, but I'll get it sharpened again and put it back in service.



 

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Offline Sedgehammer

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2020, 08:30:50 PM »
My experience with a beam saw ! LOL
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

WoW! Your stomach really swelled up..... :o

Offline tule peak timber

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2020, 09:12:44 PM »
That is belly fat.
   The beam saw is not my friend. At the same time I bought a portable bandsaw and a chain mortiser to throw up a quick building. I love the bandsaw and mortiser while the Makita beam saw remains parked. The kickback was totally my fault for not supporting the fall-off, not the saws fault.Nut behind the wheel deal........ ::)
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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2020, 10:04:13 PM »
Well I'll take back my previous comment, the Makita has more guts than I give it credit for  :D

Bindian, I think I remember you had foot trouble. My big operator error with that saw was having my tennis shoe clad foot under the offcut when not paying attention. I wear an H wide boot now, tree frogged that poor thing.
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Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2020, 10:42:43 PM »
Well I'll take back my previous comment, the Makita has more guts than I give it credit for  :D

Bindian, I think I remember you had foot trouble. My big operator error with that saw was having my tennis shoe clad foot under the offcut when not paying attention. I wear an H wide boot now, tree frogged that poor thing.
Yeah I had foot surgery on both feet.  Feel great now.   I did have to buy an expensive ($150) pair of Hoka one one shoes (super comfy running type shoes) to wear around the hangar.  Lots of guys at work have two pairs, one for work and one for leisure wear.
  My feet couldn't handle the work boots on concrete more than two hours.  Wore the shoes until the day I retired.  I wear the work boots all the time I am not on concrete.  I feel naked if I am not in my work boots.
hugs,  Brandi
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Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2020, 11:55:10 PM »
I was debating the sawsquatch saw. I ended up bolting 2 pieces saluminum angle to the bar on my milwaukee cordless chainsaw. It works awesome. Used a 12" speed square clamped to workpiece for guide.  


The guy I am patterning my log house after welded up a C channel to fit the 6 inch cants and welded up a bolt on it to act as a pivot and drilled a hole in his saw chain saw blade.  He said it worked great.  But I am thinking I want a better finished cut.

See if I got this right.............you bolted two angles to each side of your bar (notched out for the chain?) and just sit that up against a speed square to make your square cuts?  How long were the angles?
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett

Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #22 on: October 11, 2020, 12:12:11 AM »
Good morning and Holy cow!

Thank you, I didn't even know the company made a beam saw. What I don't know would fill several libraries at Alexandria.

 A complete neophyte to timber framing, but I feel that 90% of a 'professional' result in any endeavor is having the proper tool, the other 10% is learning/knowing how to use it.

 'found money' So I got the 16 5/16 circular saw in question, after some cursory research.

Finally got a chance to play@#%! Sorry, I meant to say... work with it.  I had never run a hypoid drive saw, (I think that's what it's called) of any size, Slightly different than what I was use to feeling with the standard circular saw, direct drive.

 2, 3, 4, and one five and 1/2" by 16-18" cherry, and a few red oak of the same basic dimensions, 3 1/2 inches being the largest oak.

Having nothing to compare it to, I was very happy with the cut quality and the general 'feel' of the tool. I didn't find any 'quick start' guides in the box, figured it was a circular saw. I did reference several of the 'native West Virginian' directions, (pictures) and safety symbols, there is somewhat of a 'kick' on startup even when the table is resting on the cutting surface. Must have some kind of mechanical/centrifugal braking system, blade stopped really quick when you release the trigger, so I didn't have to deal with the gyroscope effect that I read about somewhere.

It felt the best in my hands with the auxiliary handle in the lower hole near the front of the table. I don't know how to describe it, but it cuts at one speed regardless of the thickness of the board to my sense of feel/hearing, partially rotten wood being the only impediment Slightly 'gummy' feeling/sawdust discharge. Some idiot left the crotch on the cherry facing up after he rolled it up the hill and put it up on cribbing, two years before he got a sawmill Three years ago.

I think the list price is around $90 for a replacement OEM 32 tooth blade, but I found a tool store extraordinaire in Columbiana Ohio who beats the prices of Internet, and through hearsay, a renowned sharpening service less than 30 miles from my location.

I very seldom 'freehand' anything, almost always use a straight edge of some sort. Not a carpenter, or anything really, LOL But I am drawn to straight, square, level and plumb. Can't say that I ever achieved it, but the concepts are appealing.

Also stacked two 3" of each species for a single cut, didn't really notice any difference, hence the reference to it cutting at one speed, can't adequately describe it. VERY Smooth cutting/feeling.

The clip-on plastic base seemed suspect/cheap at first blush, but I now feel was a master stroke of  design/engineering. Very handy to have nearby to rest the tool in securely, Can't rust. everything seems quite well-made and heavy-duty, including the base.

 Thanks again for turning me onto the beam saw, gonna have to look for some more money. God willing, I will have a chicken coop before I depart this earth.  always wanted to be a farmer You know the old saw 'Outstanding in your field'.

Previous bad experience with chickens, didn't know any better.

I thought I had planted them too deep, or too close together.  
Let me see if I understand you right.  You are using a beam saw and gonna build a chicken coop?
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett

Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #23 on: October 11, 2020, 12:18:52 AM »
That is belly fat.
   The beam saw is not my friend. At the same time I bought a portable bandsaw and a chain mortiser to throw up a quick building. I love the bandsaw and mortiser while the Makita beam saw remains parked. The kickback was totally my fault for not supporting the fall-off, not the saws fault.Nut behind the wheel deal........ ::)
Do you have any photos of the portable bandsaw?  Only ones I ever saw were more like a powered hacksaw.
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett

Offline tule peak timber

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #24 on: October 11, 2020, 11:49:04 AM »
Here is a pic of the saw. The owner at Timberwolf Tools claimed that of all the tools he sold me the portable BS would become my favorite- and he was right. I'm new to this timber framing technique and want to thank Don P again for his advise on my first try.

 
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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #25 on: October 11, 2020, 09:23:54 PM »
I'll send photos of chainsaw setup. I dropped price  steel sheet acrossed my foot just behind steel toe > . Got bruise which turned to infection. Almost killed me from infection. Never broke the skin. Finally getting better after a month. 

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2020, 05:00:07 AM »
Let me see if I understand you right.  You are using a beam saw and gonna build a chicken coop?


Something else I didn't know, but makes perfect sense in retrospect.

Chickens are the descendants of dinosaurs! Who would've thunk it?

The neighbor lady up the Holler has a bunch and can't seem to keep them contained. Makes perfect sense now that I know that they are actually Tyrannosaurus' in disguise.  Every time those chickens see me walking to the crick, they come a runnin' and cacklin'. I hardly have time to spread the feed for the turkeys and deer before barely escaping with my life by running back to the relative safety of the shed. (Out of sight, out of mind?) It makes me shudder, thinking that one day I may trip and fall. The horror.

 Clearly, I will need to build a substantial structure.

Figure I will need a Lignatool or Arunda  dovetail system for the roosts when I can afford them, until then I will have to settle for something I can contrive with the Mikita chain mortise tool which has yet to see the light of day. The various width chains start at only $400 +.
 
 it would be nice to have $6000 plus for the Mafell bandsaw, could probably make some kind of fancy curly cue ridge pole overhang to drape the remnants of any coyote  brave enough to venture near the chickens. Sure The coyotes generally run from even fat old humans, but I don't think they would stand a chance against the local chickens.

 Apparently, Ryobi made one at some point in the past also. There is a gentleman who goes by the moniker 'samurai carpenter' I believe who has a lot of informative/entertaining videos. Somewhat of a unique personality.

Of course I want the bandsaw in question in the worst way, envy one of the seven deadly sins.  Actually thought about getting a job, at least until I could save up enough for the bandsaw and one of the dovetail systems But it's getting kind of late in life to try new things.

  Thank You's  to those who spoke highly of the O Something Brand saw blades, your testimonials are much appreciated.

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2020, 05:59:18 AM »
Edvantage, just never know do ya? Take care, glad things are better now!!!
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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2020, 11:47:22 AM »
 
This is my beam cutter. Cut 6x12 rafters and 8x18 beams. Cuts perfectly square with speed square for guide. Clamp speed square on angle for rafter cuts. Finish is decent. I housed all my beam ends so smooth finish not as critical. Otherwise I finish with palm sander. Aluminum angles could be wider. I would suggest 2" angle iron. I milled slots for chain clearance. You could just use washers between bar and aluminum. 
 

Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2020, 11:19:01 PM »
Here is a pic of the saw. The owner at Timberwolf Tools claimed that of all the tools he sold me the portable BS would become my favorite- and he was right. I'm new to this timber framing technique and want to thank Don P again for his advise on my first try.
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Tule Peak,
       Is that a Mafell Z5Ec?
                       hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett

Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #30 on: October 12, 2020, 11:26:46 PM »
I'll send photos of chainsaw setup. I dropped price  steel sheet acrossed my foot just behind steel toe (Image hidden from quote, click to view.)> . Got bruise which turned to infection. Almost killed me from infection. Never broke the skin. Finally getting better after a month.
Ouch!  Guess I win the foot race by default.  After my foot surgeries, I got a staph infection and the that foot swelled up til it the skin stretched and it hurt BAD.   I hate taking antibiotics.
        hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett

Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2020, 11:29:21 PM »

This is my beam cutter. Cut 6x12 rafters and 8x18 beams. Cuts perfectly square with speed square for guide. Clamp speed square on angle for rafter cuts. Finish is decent. I housed all my beam ends so smooth finish not as critical. Otherwise I finish with palm sander. Aluminum angles could be wider. I would suggest 2" angle iron. I milled slots for chain clearance. You could just use washers between bar and aluminum. (Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Thanks.  I didn't realize it was so close to the power head.  I just might try that on a cordless saw, when I buy one.
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett

Offline tule peak timber

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2020, 08:38:00 AM »
Here is a pic of the saw. The owner at Timberwolf Tools claimed that of all the tools he sold me the portable BS would become my favorite- and he was right. I'm new to this timber framing technique and want to thank Don P again for his advise on my first try.
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Tule Peak,
       Is that a Mafell Z5Ec?
                       hugs,  Brandi
Yes it is a Mafell. I have my own foot story if you are interested, not saw related though. Rob
persistence personified - never let up , never let down

Offline Tom King

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2020, 05:40:29 PM »
Tom, On that Oshlun blade, did you get the 32 or 60 tooth blade?
I remembered to check today.  It's the lower tooth count blade.  I was actually surprised, remembering how perfectly smooth the cuts were.

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #34 on: October 13, 2020, 10:34:05 PM »
With most common material, higher tooth count mainly sucks up horsepower and doesn't improve cut quality enough to matter. Sharp and steady means more.
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline John S

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #35 on: October 30, 2020, 09:07:50 AM »
I have the new Skill wormdrive Supersawsquatch and have used it a few times.  It works great.  I cannot imagine getting a better quality cut from a chain saw.
2018 LT40HDG38 Wide

Offline Dana Stanley

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #36 on: November 06, 2020, 09:05:08 PM »
My beam saw and mortising drill! Old Wen saw, and Chinese 1/2" drill. If I did more, I would get a Circular timber saw for angles and cleaner cut.

 

 
Making Sawdust, boards and signs.
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Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #37 on: November 15, 2020, 10:50:18 PM »
I tried the Super Sawsquatch today.  I has unbelievable torque when starting and stoping.  You really need to hang on to it.  It really is a huge, awkward saw.  I can see why you suppose to clamp the work down.  Learning curve continuing.
hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett

Offline nopoint

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #38 on: November 16, 2020, 09:02:49 PM »
Stay safe out there. I have the makita saw and personally I feel much safer picking up the chainsaw. Although the cut quality isnt there... but I still try.

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #39 on: November 17, 2020, 09:57:50 AM »
I just got a Sawsquatch, it is so much easier to cut with then the Makita.  
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Offline Bindian

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Re: Beam Saw
« Reply #40 on: November 18, 2020, 02:08:07 AM »
I just got a Sawsquatch, it is so much easier to cut with then the Makita.  
Glad to hear that.
  hugs,  Brandi
Mahindra 6520 4WD with loader/backhoe and a Caterpiller E70 Excavator.  My mill is a Woodmizer LT40HD Wide Diesel.

My Hero is Johnny Jett


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