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Author Topic: Tree ID Reference Book  (Read 426 times)

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Offline tmoody052000

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Tree ID Reference Book
« on: February 10, 2021, 06:59:49 PM »
What book would you guys recommend for identifying trees in North America?  I live in Montana and we have mostly have pine, fir, larch and spruce.  Occasionally I might find some maple or oak that somebody wants removed from their yard. 

Offline Otis1

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2021, 10:03:40 PM »
National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Trees of North America

Has color pictures of leaves, bark, twigs, seeds/ cones and range maps. 

Offline Wattwood

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2021, 07:32:31 AM »
Petersons Field Guide to Western Trees.
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Offline zippski

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2021, 08:28:23 AM »
I have several books on tree identification that I regularly reference.  I am not a huge fan of the Peterson guides. My go-to book for years has been "Trees in Canada" which has just published a second edition.  All of the range maps in the west include Montana and other northern and midwest US states.  Beautiful large color photos of both trees AND bark, which is rare.

Here's a link to an expensive copy on the Lee Valley website that has page views.  It's probably on Amazon for less

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/garden/books-and-dvds/10087-trees-in-canada-revised-edition?item=49L1012&utm_source=free_google_shopping&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=shopping_feed&gclid=Cj0KCQiAyJOBBhDCARIsAJG2h5dLQ7JRcr-0McCjIN9Z9vEjHKL2ilTICIT-ljVx4L62xqZ_nkYSRpYaAkI9EALw_wcB

Leigh
zippski

Offline Wattwood

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2021, 07:51:37 AM »
Petersons is old school for sure but for many of us they were the go to guide back in the day and did their job well. Should be easy to find used copies. Rob
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Offline Skip

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2021, 11:45:34 AM »
The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees (Eastern Region) is what I use  :P .

Online SwampDonkey

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2021, 04:56:36 PM »
The Audubon books work well. :)

My first book was "Native Trees of Canada". But soon found out it was not used at University, but was used at Forest Ranger School. In university we had to use 'Textbook of Dendrology' because of the scientific terms, not just the Latin names. Besides an old English perfectionist for a professor. He thought he was going to trip me up one day on maple ID. Was it sugar maple or Norway? I was prepared, as I knew Norway had milky sap on the leaf petiole when fresh picked. But I didn't win them all. :D
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Offline mainepatriot

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2021, 09:16:54 AM »
Forest Trees of Maine: Handbooks & Guides: Publications: Division of Forestry: Maine ACF


This is the one I use.  A state forester gave me a copy years ago, you can still buy it.  Nice spiral binding on it which is handy.

Offline Clark

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2021, 07:13:14 PM »
If youre in NW Montana youve got your hands full learning the various conifers. I worked there for a brief spell and I think there were ~15 conifers to be aware of. Very interesting country to work in. 

I dont have a specific book recommendation but something that applies to Montana or the northern Rockies would be a good start.

Clark
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Offline tmoody052000

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2021, 06:59:51 PM »
The Audubon books work well. :)

My first book was "Native Trees of Canada". But soon found out it was not used at University, but was used at Forest Ranger School. In university we had to use 'Textbook of Dendrology' because of the scientific terms, not just the Latin names. Besides an old English perfectionist for a professor. He thought he was going to trip me up one day on maple ID. Was it sugar maple or Norway? I was prepared, as I knew Norway had milky sap on the leaf petiole when fresh picked. But I didn't win them all. :D
I have purchased the book 'Native Trees of Canada'.  It is so nice that my wife wants it out as a coffee table book.  Great recommendation.  Thank you.

Offline firefighter ontheside

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Re: Tree ID Reference Book
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2021, 04:36:27 PM »
I got this book about 35 years ago called, "Knowing your Trees".  It has I would guess most north american species in it.  It is still available on Amazon.  I have used it a lot in that time.

I also have a much bigger book called "Silvics of North America, Conifers"   There's a lot of useful info in there too.
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