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Author Topic: Chainsaw Milling  (Read 3829 times)

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Offline iain

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Chainsaw Milling
« on: February 21, 2006, 05:43:06 AM »
I'm just in the process of buying the big milling attachment from Logosol,
(time is way against me building my dream slabber)
I'm going to hook up one of my 084's with a 60" bar, it's not a modded power head, just normal,
any advice for the best rim sprocket,
or infact any comments at all (pertainant to the subject please)
the Logosol rep is being most wonderful and attentive, but this size is outside there experience
i will be milling old Brown Oak
 48" Ash
and 44"+ semi spalted Beach
I've ordered an aux oiler from the granberg people

also can the 075 be upped to an 090 just by changing the barrel and bits (i've got two 075's)


thanks iain

Offline DonE911

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2006, 07:36:48 AM »
Thats a much larger bar than I have ever run, so I don't have the answers for you on that one.   I have an M7 but don't generally use bars bigger than 25 inches on an 066.

I did cut some very dry red oak..... must have been down for 10 years or more... I only got one cut per chain and lots of sparks... was a cool show at dusk.   When I say one cut per chain,  I mean that It "HAD TO BE" sharpened before attempting another cut.   I would hate to hand file a chain long as your will be.

I would like to hear about your big mill once you have a chance to use it.

Offline iain

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2006, 10:46:34 AM »
Thanks for the reply Don

i've used a pair of 084's on a 48" speber mill before
and the currant sperber with twin 075's and 36" (with the rollers off) is out on loan,
but it needs two good bodies on it to make it work, so i'm going to try just me, as the cuts will be down hill a bit, so it sounds like easy work :o ::)


iain

Offline ehp

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2006, 12:33:43 PM »
I think you want 070's if you want to use 090's jugs and pistons, the 075 is a different type of motor if my memory servers me correctly

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2006, 01:32:19 PM »
The 075 is a laydown and the 090 is a vertical. I have seen an 090 jug married to an 075 c/c but it was strictly for competition. Ugly too but it screamed. :D :D :D
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline iain

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2006, 02:21:19 PM »
Sawguy do you know if they go together easy?

hope Lucky Allen's reading this, cause i drpped into the non ferrous scrapper down the road (800yrds), and there on a pallet was the sweetest profile Alu,
just waiting for me to pick it up and make a slabbing frame, around the corner was a load of heavy section to make rails (like the peterson rails), all at £2 a kilo, put what i think i need  to one side, and will pick it up at the weekend 8) 8)



iain

Offline StihlDoc

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2006, 08:07:17 PM »
It's going to be sloooow going. You can expect A LOT of vibration with that long of a bar when entering the cut. The Logosol just does not have the support for that bar length and the engine support will flex quite a bit. Once you get the cut going you should be okay but it will be a slow process. Suggest an 8 tooth 3/8" rim and use 1.6 mm gauge chain. The auxillary oiler will be a must. Make sure to use a sprocket tip bar with 3/8" pitch nose.

The STIHL 070 and 090 cylinder will not fit up to the STIHL 075 or 076. Completely different design between the two style of machines.

Offline iain

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2006, 09:23:20 PM »
Thanks for the reply StihlDoc
I may now not go with either the Alaska or the Logosol after my find of Alu at the scrappers this afternoon

the bar is a sprocket tip and flexy (reminds me of a fencing foil)

i wont bother the 075 then :D

thanks again


iain

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2006, 10:19:51 PM »
Mamma Mia that's a bunch of back breaking work.I've done very little milling,using a Homey 2100 and a Mac sp 125.Both powerful old work horses but even at that it is slow process.
I did see,on the internet,a slabbing mill that used an 18 HP Briggs.That,I would think,would be the way to go for somebody interested in serious slabbing.

Offline oldsaw

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2006, 08:29:43 PM »
Hey Al, are you going to carry it into the woods for me?  Can I hang it from my garage ceiling on bicycle hangers?  Can I put a gallon can of gas, gallon of bar oil, my tool bag, and other things inside it like I can my Alaskan to minimize trips?

Yes, it is hard work, and it takes some time, but, in my situation, I can't think of anything better.  If I can move the logs, it'll go out to JR's place and on the Norwood.  If I can't move the log, I move the boards.  That's why I have a chainsaw mill.

Just givin' you some good natured crap, just seemed like you needed a little today.

Mark

So many trees, so little money, even less time.

Stihl 066, Husky 262, Husky 350 (warmed over), Homelite Super XL, Homelite 150A

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2006, 09:05:08 AM »
iain and Stihl Doc, the two can be married but I never said it would be simple. :D Larry is an accomplished machinist and a bit nuts, never does anything the easy way.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline Deadwood

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2006, 05:26:30 PM »
My father and I cobbled together a chainsaw mill. It worked...sort of.

I mean it cut lumber. You made one cut today and then made the next cut the next day. The lumber came out reasonably smooth and the sawmill worked, but t was slow.

I got a picture of it around here somewhere. When I find it I will post it.

Offline woodswalker

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2006, 12:50:30 AM »
Hello everyone I am new to this forum, I have just bought an 088 stihl w/2 36" bars and "mill attachment" I am new to milling with a chainsaw or anything else for that matter.Although I was raised on some model chainsaw or another. I bought the saw in the hopes I could replace a few timbers in our family barn.... that has needed attention for a long time...I thank you for any fore thought you may have concerning this matter .The barn is a hip style .The barn was  constructed of white oak...we don't have alot of that wood...We do have alot of large red oak...I know these two woods are like day and knight. I Am located in SE Michigan with ties to Kentucky

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2006, 07:12:04 AM »
woodswalker where are you from?Put that into your profile for us.Don't hear much about red oak on here.That's from up in my neck of the woods.Welcome,this place is great for answers.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline beenthere

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Re: Chainsaw Milling
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2006, 10:00:43 AM »
woodswalker
Welcome to the forum.
Re: your "day and night" comment about red and white oak.  There is some difference if you are talking about resistance to decay between the two, or their use in whiskey barrels.
But for a timber in the family barn, if it is in a place that is high and dry (which probably isn't true if one needs replacement), the red oak could be considered. The strength of red oak is near to the strength of white oak.  Is the beam to be replaced where it is continually damp?  What size would it need to be?
Ash might be another consideration for a replacement beam, if the EAB rules can be followed. :)
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others


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