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Author Topic: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?  (Read 13069 times)

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Offline Saki

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Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« on: November 23, 2006, 09:26:53 AM »
Looking at replacing some cordless tools. Local big box is running a special with the Ryobi 18 volt tools. Also running a special on extra batteries and charger. Long story short, can get a drill, saw, 3 batteries and 2 chargers for about $120.00 I have a Ryobi 110volt planer, and have had excellent luck with it, but have never had anything cordless from them. Anybody have a good experience or bad to share? Tools have a 30 day money back no questions asked policy and a 2 year warranty. Any input appreciated. Thanks.

Offline brdmkr

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2006, 09:35:50 AM »
Hey Saki

I used to be skeptical of Ryobi tools, but I bought their 18 V cordless about 18 months ago when it was on sale at HD.  I have not had one bit of troublse since I have had it.  If I needed another cordless drill, I'd likely buy that one again.

Ialso bought their corded circular saw.  The only thing I don't like about it is the base.  I'd prefer a heavier base with a macined edge instead of the turned-up edge this one has.  Still, I think it is a good bit ahead of Black and Decke.

So, to answer your question, nothing but good luck.
Lucas 618  Mahindra 4110, FEL and pallet forks, some cant hooks, and a dose of want-to

Offline Mooseherder

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2006, 09:55:56 AM »
I've owned the Ryobi 14.4 Drill and Flashlight for a couple years as they were a package deal. Both have performed well and are used often. I especially love the Flashlight. We use the heck out of it at camp. With both batteries charged before hand. It'll get us through a couple weeks of usage.

Offline DonE911

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2006, 09:57:29 AM »
I used a friends Ryobi cordless drill all day screwing down a deck....  it worked good for that purpose.  

I always seem to get a Ryobi tool for christmas or some other gift giving event.... the table saw was a pos... jig saw was only slightly better... no longer have one of their tools, but christmas is comming.

Offline Trent

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2006, 10:22:50 AM »
If you need to do any real work, stay away from cordless tools. buy a generator. The big cordless sets for $500 remind me of toy sets. Sorry guys. To drill a few holes, I think they are fine, to saw anything - give me a break. 
Can't fish, can't hunt, don't care about sports. Love to build, machine, fabricate.      Trent Williams

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2006, 10:26:55 AM »
I have a Dewalt cordless drill which is fine for small jobs, quite convenient actually, but like Trent says, it is really not adequate for heavier work.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline mike_van

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2006, 11:02:04 AM »
I've had good deals with this place - LINK TYLER TOOLS  They have free shipping over 99.00,  and it's fast shipping too, 5 days or less.
I was the smartest 16 year old I ever knew.

Offline blaze83

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2006, 02:17:13 PM »
I would have to say so so luck with the Ryobi tool set.

The drills are pretty good, with a lot of use had the batteries stop making contact with the connecting points in the drill handle and then I'd have to smack the thing to get it to seat right so it would work...finally ended up getting new batteries
the skill saw is nice for cutting siding and anything less than an inch thick
the sawsall is ok for clipping of a few nails or cutting drywall out....if you need to cut 2x4's and other heavy cutting go with the real deal......(my favorite demo tool by the way) splitwood_smiley
the jig saw is ok....poorest tool in the set in my opinion....again for heavey cutting it isn't good at all...I have the Bosch corded version   I like it alot
the flashlight is a very handy item and the vacuum is welllll.....not very handy

If I had a limited budget.....which I usually do I'd by them again....if I wake up some morning and there is a bag of money on the porch I'd upgrade to dewalt or bosch or ridgid

I like to use them in combo with my corded tools....if I'm doing a lot of screwing like a deck or something I will drill all my countersinks with the corded and then come back and drive all my screws with the cordless

just one view

God bless

Steve
I'm always amazed that no matter how bad i screw up Jesus still loves me

Offline rebocardo

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2006, 02:46:28 PM »
Cordless drills are fine, I have had Ryobi before and I rate them average.

As for cordless saws of any nature, circle or sawzall, stick to corded. Main reason I got a 1200w inverter for my truck.


Offline thecfarm

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2006, 05:12:49 PM »
We're talking cordless here.Can't compare a sears garden tractor to a 40hp john Deere tractor.I myself would much rather be putting down a steel roof with a cordless drill than to drag around a electrical cord.For what I need that 18v Ryobi is fine.The drill is real good,I haven't used my electric drill since my wife bought me a stater kit in Sept.That came with a sander,have not used it at all,circular saw,works great for small jobs.I use that when I only need a few cuts.That's what's it's made for,cann't expect to build a house with it.The flashlight gets used each night for chores.I feel the 18v has plenty of power.I used my FIL 18v before I got one to screw down the metal on the house barn.Has an adjustment so you cann't twist the screws off.I was thinking about a dewalt until the step son had trouble with batteries.Wasn't even a year old and both batteries died on it.The big box store would not go good on it,told him to let his mother at them.She would of get the batteries.I like the Ryobi.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline maple flats

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2006, 07:08:51 PM »
My first GOOD cordless was a DeWalt 18V drill and after several years I got a Ryobi. Both are good but the DeWalt was better. Price however is at least double or even triple for DW, might be a good reason. I do like the Ryobi tho and think it was worth the $. Still have the DW and may get a new battery for it sometime, batteries cost more than whole Ryobi/2 batteries+ flashlight & charger.
logging small time for years but just learning how,  2012 36 HP Mahindra tractor, 3point log arch, 8000# class excavator, lifts 2500# and sets logs on mill precisely where needed, Woodland Mills HM130Max , maple syrup a hobby that consumes my time. looking to learn blacksmithing.

Offline Dale Hatfield

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2006, 11:00:45 PM »
I have had  3 18 volt drills in the past few years. I just got another new set  for Christmas . I can see the box from here .
Here is my thoughts . I have had 14 .4  and 18 volt dewalts   I couldn't keep the 18 volt batters in the drill.  the 14 .4  well just lacked in power but got the job done.
I have managed to kill any/ all battery's  .  The build up of heat from use needs to cool down before charging otherwise battery life is short.I have killed every battery  by hot charging ,building metal frame/pole barns.I have never had any problems from them that wernt caused by the user. dropping being the main killer.I dropped one from 3rd floor roof .on to concrete, told ground man to pitch it , go get me another, he sent same one back up no damage. Buy the extra battery . That way one can cool while other is charging.
My thought's are the drill  works like any other.  slight more bulk then DW seems to take same abuse. The big factor for me is the price its less than half  and last as long .
Dale
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Offline TexasTimbers

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2006, 11:53:29 PM »
I don't want to sound harsh and buck the trend but Ryobi is considered junk amongst professionals who use cordless everyday. When Lithium Ion technology started coming out I bought the Milwaukee 28V drill with extra battery right away. Li-Ion is so far ahead of Ni-Cad it isn't even the same animal. The same with comparing,, say an 18V Milwaukee  Ni-cad to a Ryobi 18V Ni-Cad. They are both 18V. they are both the same battery technology - they use 1.2V cells bunched together to achieve 18 volts, but the Milwaukee battery weighs alot more than the Ryobi (you can't use this comparison with Li-Ion it is much lighter but more powerful and longer-lasting that Ni-Cad). Ryobi just uses less whatever the heavy stuff is in Ni-Cad that gives it the endurance you want. Maybe some elctrical engineeer can explain it better. I just know that Ryobi batteries stink to high heaven.
I also have a wide asorttment of cordless; Hitachi, Milwaukee, Panasonic, DeWalt, porter Cable, and Bosch and they ALL are acceptable as to power and endurance in my experience with Milwaukee and PAnasonic professional models almost always winning endurance tests. I got suckered for one of those Ryobi 18V $149 deals a few years ago. The tools themselves are okay but the batteries won't hold a charge for very long after you put them through some serious cycles. Maybe they are okay for very light occassional use. But if you plan on using them alot and depending on them - my experience says

BUYER BEWARE!
The oil is all in Texas, but the dipsticks are in D.C.

Offline solodan

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2006, 01:08:51 AM »

I don't want to sound harsh and buck the trend but Ryobi is considered junk amongst professionals who use cordless everyday.

I agree with Kev, but, without sounding to harsh, ;) professional is a very broad term.  I think it really depends on your needs. I've had several corded Ryobi tools, which are now all dead except one, and they all worked fine, and had a life that well exceeded its price. I have a cheap grizzly 18volt drill, which IMHO sucks, but who cares,I never use it. Of all of the drilling I do, 90% of the time I am using very   large forsners or augers, something way too heavy for any cordless tool. ::) If  I were installing blinds all day, I guess I'd get a top name brand corless. I think a Ryobi is a good choice if you only need it for small jobs here and there, and in that case I would say it is money better spent. :)

And actually I like using a corded drill better, even for driving screws, you just gotta hold on tight, cause it'll rip your arm off.  :D

Offline TexasTimbers

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2006, 07:29:32 AM »
Of all of the drilling I do, 90% of the time I am using very   large forsners or augers, something way too heavy for any cordless tool.

Solodan, it use to be but this is no longer the case. Get one of the Li-Ion 18V - 28V drills. Makita, Milwaukee, Bosch doesn't matter. It will drive forstners/augers/self-drilling wood eaters as good as your 1/2" corded drills. You will never buy another Ni-Cad system or pick up another corded drill once you start using a Li-Ion powered drill.  Unless of course you are drilling with a 6" self-feeding auger then you do need a 3/4" drill with another man on the other handle.

Which brings up another point, unless you are using your forstners in hardwood or softwoods that have a tendency to tear out, if you haven't tried the self-feeding solid body bits that look like forstners but are not, you are in for a nice suprize. Downside: I can't find them in sizes smaller than 1.75", and they are TOO AGRESSIVE for some applications. They will tear out slightly in some brittle hardwoods and stringy softwoods but are great for elcetrical or any other rough work you might do. They are on a much higher order of speed than forstners but forstners will not rip your wood apart coming out the other side when doing finish either.
Ideal situation if you are drilling alot of the same size holes would be to have two Li-Ion drills set up one with self-feeding to drill 95% of the depth and other with a forstner to finish it off.

P.S. A 28V Li-Ion will break your wrist just as fast as a corded drill.  :o
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Offline tcsmpsi

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2006, 08:25:04 AM »
Depending on what your expectation/use of the Ryobi tools you speak of is going to be.

I got a similar kit as you mention, drill, saw, light and cut out tool.  The drill has worked very well for its intended purpose.  The saw, well, I use it only in a pinch inside stuff that needs just a little trimming and batteries just won't fulfill very much cutting with it (but, never expected it too). The cut out tool works well. 

Over all, I am pleased with the kit, and it is a little better than I expected.  I've had cordless Makitas and Milwaulkees and just plain wore them out, but that is when they worked almost every day.

I have real saws and drill motors for doing the bulk work. 
\\\"In the end, it is a moral question as to whether man applies what he has learned or not.\\\" - C. Jung

Offline BBTom

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #16 on: November 24, 2006, 08:58:56 AM »
Just a note all those who have had batteries die on cordless tools.  I had mine rebuilt by my local interstate battery store.  Cost was about 1/3 the price of a new one and they claim they are better than OEM.  They have worked well for me.
2001 LT40HDD42RA with lubemizer, debarker, laser, accuset. Retired, but building a new shop and home in Missouri.

Offline TexasTimbers

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2006, 09:39:43 AM »
Just a note all those who have had batteries die on cordless tools. I had mine rebuilt by my local interstate battery store. Cost was about 1/3 the price of a new one and they claim they are better than OEM. They have worked well for me.

 that's a great option but for DIYers you can also save a ton and do it for about 1/10th the cost or even less.....  NiCad Generics
The oil is all in Texas, but the dipsticks are in D.C.

Offline beenthere

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #18 on: November 24, 2006, 10:25:04 AM »
........
 that's a great option but for DIYers you can also save a ton and do it for about 1/10th the cost or even less.....  NiCad Generics

Would you elaborate on that.  Are there parts listed there that can be interchanged within the cordless batteries, such as the 12v, or the 18v ??  Thanks......(signed part-time DIY'r)  :)
south central Wisconsin
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Offline TexasTimbers

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Re: Ryobi cordless tools - Good or bad luck?
« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2006, 11:14:17 AM »
I have never taken the time to do it because for me it is easier to buy a replacement, but when money is tight one can become quite industrious.

All one would have to do is buy the generic 1.25 (don't buy the 1.2v that are also availaible they don't hold a charge as well. You wouldn't think the .05 would matter but I have read where it is noticable) that are sized close enough to go into your battery case and solder them together. You have to open the battery case (I am goinjg to open a bad 18v Milwaukee up to show you ain't I nice? ;)) and remove the old ones.

Hang on here we go .....................


This battery uses T10s; blow any screws out with high pressure air so the bit will fully seat and not strip the delicate screws; now the top has been removed ...............


And so has the battery cluster ...........



Now that the cover has been removed we can see they are connected in series but we knew that because voltage is additive in series and 1.2 x 15 batteries = 18v. i don't know how milwaukee gets by with the 1.2v but they are smarter than me that's for sure so who cares.


here the cluster is looking like some sort of queer electronic tinsle for the tree this year  ???



Anyway, you will have to measure the batteries (these are roughly 1 5/8" x 15/16" excluding cardboard sleeve) and call a supplier and order the appropriate size and quantity (order a spare or two they are cheap) and solder them together with little flat wire and be quick because prolonged excessive heat will probably fry or damage them. ::) You could try one of those "cold solder" tols. i haven't had much luck with mine :(

For comparison here's one of my sick Ryobi batteries. It looks sort of the same inside but can't hold a candle to most other brands even when new.


For you fellas who have made positive comments about Ryobi please know that I am not saying your experiences are invalid; it's just that I use my tools in extremely heavy duty applications. it's like one poster said he doesn't expect much from them so he doesn't get let down.


On second thought beenthere, get your yellow pages and look up your nearest Interstate battery dealer that is starting to sound like a pretty good option! ;D :D




The oil is all in Texas, but the dipsticks are in D.C.


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