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Author Topic: cleaning hogs  (Read 8231 times)

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Offline highpockets

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2007, 06:04:00 AM »
When I   Click to copy photo insertion code to clipboard and do a paste I always seem to come up with the previous mess you see here.   


 
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Offline treebucker

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2007, 07:46:49 AM »
The part i dont like is washing them nasty things, scrub brush dish washing liquid and lots of water. Before you gut or singe it, its sooo nasty.

When we scalded them we would wash them before putting them in the dip tank. They were washed a second time when we were done scraping the hair off them. We did not use soap but the hot water scalding would remove the stubborn stuff. The final washing took care of the rest.

I helped a couple guys skin one a few years ago. They were experienced at butchering hogs and I had butchered hogs with them many times in years gone by. It had been a while since any of us had done it. After it was shot they started skinning it. The hog was filthy. I tried to stop them and suggested taking it to a nearby hydrant and washing it down. That idea was rejected. What a mess that was. Yes, they did wash it down after it was skinned then tried to trim off the dirt but it's funny how people get in a hurry and unreasonable.

Some time later someone else ask me to help them prep 8 hogs. He came by about an hour before dark. I told him it was too late in the day to tackle that many hogs at once but he said we could work under a utility light. I also called into question the weather forecast as while it was cold enough at the moment, they were calling for daytime highs in the 50s over the next few days. But I grudgingly agreed to help and we went to a nearby farm and started the process. He was experienced at killing hogs but he was going to make the same mistake of not washing them. I told him what a mess he was about to make and he agreed to wash them. There was poor prep all the way around on this job and it didn't suprise me that the water hose was too short so he ended up washing them over an already muddy grassy area that soon worked itself into a mud hole. We ended up working in the dark under a light that wasn't bright enough for my poor eyes. The wind was howling and it was cold. There was no shelter. It was getting late and we gave up after 4 hogs. I have no idea why he waited so late in the day to begin.  I didn't help him kill the next four. I found out later he left them hanging for 5 days in that weather. Daytime highs got into the 50s.  Is it greed that causes this breakdown in common sense?
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Offline beenthere

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2007, 09:57:24 AM »
highpockets
always preview your post, and you will see what it looks like first. Then be sure the image brackets are before ( like [ ] ) and after (like[/ ] ) the pasted url.

Previewing saves a lot of false posts, the way I see it.  :)
By adding the beginning bracket [ to your url line, this is what came up.
 


south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline Dana

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2007, 01:31:29 PM »
Highposkets looks like there will be ham for Easter. ;D
Grass-fed beef farmer, part time sawyer

Offline Robert R

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2007, 08:27:57 PM »
Feeders are cheap.  Get em at 40 pounds.  Butcher them at 100--at that size, they aren't any harder than a deer.  If you need more meat than that, do 2 or 3.  I'd rather do 3 100 pounders than one 250 pounder.  If I let them get bigger than 100, I find the money well spent to take them to the professionals.  I skin them.  I don't cure nothing.  I find fresh ham and just plain side meat very tasty.  If I take one in, I have it cured.  I also don't do the lard at home but there isn't much fat on a 100 pounder anyway.  I get the lard done off the bigger ones, though. 

I once bought a 400 sow at an auction for nearly nothing.  Never took her off the trailer.  The next day, she went to the butcher and was turned into whole hog sausage I sold at a farmer's market.  I more than tripled my money off that deal with about 3 hours of actual time invested.  One of the few farmer's market things that really panned out for me.  That and fryers.  People get plum silly over farm fresh chicken.
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Offline highpockets

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2007, 08:17:58 AM »
Beenthere you are so smart.  Of course I can't remember from time to time. I haven't noticed the preview.  Thanks

We got 56 logs to saw. 
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Offline farmerdoug

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2007, 02:13:25 PM »
My Dad and Grandfather use to burn the hogs with straw.  We hosed off the hogs in a raised holding pen with wood slat floor to clean them while still alive.  They were then run on to the killing floor that was covered with straw.  After they were shot we proped them sitting up on their bellies and covered them with a 2 inch layer of straw.  The straw was then set on fire and it burned off most of the hair.  It was then rolled and straw burned on the belly to clean it too.  Then it was scraped and burned with a hand torch for the haired missed.  It was alot of work but my Granddad used to sell several every Saturday on Eastern Market so we knew what Fridays work was.

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Offline Michigan Mike

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Re: cleaning hogs
« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2007, 01:54:12 AM »
I find that about every other year I end up roasting a hog. The first ones I did with the help of friends we did it the traditional way boil water dip hog scrape. Thats time consuming and required at a minimum a tractor with a bucket. The ones I have done lately are first pressure washed then singed with what I call a sand torch " a large propane torch" then pressure washed again this does a nice job. Last one I did the farmer I bought the hog from supplied the torch and the pressure washer for free if you bought hog from him. He also took care of the guts. I thought it was a pretty good deal. O yea I rented the cooker from him too.


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