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Author Topic: Old Corley Mill  (Read 7025 times)

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Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2003, 09:36:38 PM »
hi everyone, most of you helped me get my old a.b. farquhar mill going late this winter remember !  i am using a 100 horse farmall diesel tractor and plug my hydraulic carriage lines right into the tractor and use the p.t.o and run at 425 rpm with my old 48 inch 40 tooth disston blade and i been sawing like a mad man !  i just pull the carriage lever and speed up the carriage so i get nice sawchips and not fine sawdust and then listen to the diesel outside the saw shed and just by listening and feel i can pretty much find the sweet spot now and its a bit different like with a 20 by 20 inch cant compared to a 8 by 8 cant, not much but i do slow down just a bit on the big stuff but never so slow that i start noticing that really fine sawdust, i never bothered to measure the feed because i dont seem to care, its when i hear the diesel start to snort and kind of leave it there until i am through the log, still saving for a new blade of same dimensions and probably have it hammered for around 500 to 540, starting out i didnt want to have everything screaming at me , plus i have a cable with pulleys that will shut off the pto at the back of the tractor and it hangs right next to where i stand and run the hydraulic levers and at anytime i can reach up and give it a tug and feel very safe with home made contraption, this is my first reply now as a sawyer with some good days under my belt allready ok !
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2003, 09:50:02 PM »
another thing is that i have worn shanks and filed as much i could to get somewhat of a square shoulder,my teeth suck but i can cut about 10 big fat logs and then i just give them a quick filing and notice major horsepower improvements evertime, but the blade and everything else is cool after a long cutting session, one thing is that the blade was frying in the direct sunlight ,i mean you could fry eggs on it so i covered up the south wall of the saw shed and now i dont have to worry about the power of the sun causing the blade to wobble ,this old blade is stiff and straight as can be ! hope this might help you too ok !
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline Frickman

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2003, 10:09:25 PM »
Unclebuck,

Glad to hear you are running an old Farquar mill. My one grandfather has one he bought off my other grandfather in the 70's. It is all wood and still like new. My other grandfather had bought the mill to get its International engine to put on his Frick. The Farquar is now run with a 671 Detroit that came from a WW2 landing craft. Needless to say, we've never run out of power on that mill.

You're doing good if you're learning how to saw by "feel". Every circle mill is different. We had one old Frick years ago that only my grandfather could saw on. It was getting pretty worn out and you had to know how hard to pull the stick to get it to saw. Fortunately that mill has been replaced.

Another thing I see you are learning is a circle mill is a system of components that must all work together. You have to get your motor set to turn the saw at the speed it has been hammered for. Then you have to adjust your feed rate to the diameter and species of log. The only way to learn is to keep sawing.

Along that same line, sometimes things work that you can't explain, and might contradict conventional wisdom or textbook knowledge. My saw has very little lead, maybe 1/32". The book says 1/16" to 1/8". I've tried that, no good. Set the lead back to just under 1/32" and it saws great. You might think the saw would rub the log on the gigback, but it doesn't. I can't explain it, and neither can my saw doctor.  I just leave it alone and keep running it. I also run my saw kind of slow, about 400 RPM's. My 471 keeps it running consistently though, so I don't have a alot of the problems you get when your saw slows down in the cut. My family has always run their saws slow, we have fewer saw problems and feel a little safer when running a stick mill.

Keep up the good work, and thanks for keeping another old circle mill alive.

Frickman
If you're not broke down once in a while, you're not working hard enough

I'm not a hillbilly. I'm an "Appalachian American"

Retired  Conventional hand-felling logging operation with cable skidder and forwarder, Frick 01 handset sawmill

Pretend farmer when I have the time

Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2003, 10:33:31 PM »
last thing for the night here,  i set the lead to 0 and the back of the blade was knicking the cant on the gigback so i just set the lead so it stopped doing that and everything was perfect, only made one initial lead measurement and the rest were trial and error, i read the lunstrom book so many times it feels good to have put it away for awhile but will probably read it again next winter, it was a good read ! goodnight ! :P
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #24 on: June 09, 2003, 10:41:15 PM »
hello Frickman, i have a 671 with little hours on it and someday i be putting that on the mill, just read your article and found it very interesting and thought i was goofy for turning 425 rpm but i like it ! well i be catching up with the circular mill articles for the next week, i been busy ! take care
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2003, 04:39:11 AM »
Lead is a tricky thing.  I had one mill that needed 3/8" in order for it to run right.  I don't even know what my lead is on this mill.  I can make adjustments in sawing and filing to compensate for any lead or saw problems.  

You will also see a difference in lead with the weather.  For frozem wood it is often best to take some lead off.  Some of the more woolier woods may need more lead.

Another factor is your swaging of teeth.  As you file your teeth back, you'll have to swage your teeth or your saw might rub.  Some of this is also specie dependent and how far back you want to file your teeth.
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Offline Norm

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #26 on: June 10, 2003, 08:53:41 AM »
Glad to hear your getting some time in with your mill Unclebuck. Nothing more satisfying than working hard on a project and having it turn out so well.

Norm

Offline Frickman

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #27 on: June 10, 2003, 08:54:42 PM »
Ron,

Are you saying that you sometimes file your saw "not square" to compensate for problems with the mill? If so, you'd fit in well around here. Growing up I heard both grandfathers and all their friends talk about "filing lead into the saw". When I started sawing I did the same thing. I had nothing but problems. Read Casey Creamer's book, lined up my mill, and started filing square. Haven't had a problem since. Now we run carbide, 9/32" bits that are made locally. The oldtimers around here think I'm doing it all wrong, but the mill runs and saws great.          

I don't want to get your dander up, you just sound like alot of fellows around here. If it works for you then more power to you. Try a set of carbide bits sometime, you might not want to go back to steel.

Frickman
If you're not broke down once in a while, you're not working hard enough

I'm not a hillbilly. I'm an "Appalachian American"

Retired  Conventional hand-felling logging operation with cable skidder and forwarder, Frick 01 handset sawmill

Pretend farmer when I have the time

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2003, 04:58:33 AM »
There are 2 ways of filing lead into a saw.  One is to go in an angle.  That pulls the blade in that direction.  This is the method used by most oldtimers.  (I'm starting to fit that category)  :D

One that I use more often is just to touch up the sides with a file.  I find as I file back through the teeth and depending on species, I need to "adjust" my lead.  If the saw is leading in, touch up on the log side.  Leading out, touch up on the board side.  I'm only talking a light file stroke.

I find that it differs with each saw.  Some saws run great, some don't.  Same mfg, same saw doc, same teeth, etc.  But, different steel and different kiln times.

I'm running a vertical edger, so you can't saw off line.  Too much in one direction and you have a mark on your next board.  Too far in the other direction and the edging strip remains on.  Any correction in the next board wiil give you a miscut.  

I looked into carbide, but can't get over the price thing.  I can hardly get through a set of regular steel teeth without hitting trash.  The cost differential is too great.  I save money by not using chrome.  Don't the carbide shatter when hitting trash?

Carbide is 4 times greater than steel.  Chrome is 50% higher.  
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Offline Frickman

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Re: Old Corley Mill
« Reply #29 on: June 15, 2003, 08:04:10 PM »
Ron,

I get 9/32" BDF carbide bits made locally for about $2.85 / each. They cost less to have retipped. They must be good because most of the mills around here run them. The place that makes them is called The Sharp Shop, in Connellsville, PA. They specialize in sharpening for the lumber industry. The last box of steel bits I bought were $1.10 / each, so the carbide are only a little more.

Yes, the carbide shatters when you hit tramp metal or embedded stones. We watch where our logs come from and thus don't hit much. If you buy logs as gatewood then you might have to scan the logs.

The carbide saves me more in sharpening time than they cost to install. Sometimes we run several days without sharpening, abd then maybe just a touchup. The bits are very easy to sharpen with a grinder. My right hand man grinds them as he is good with things like that. I don't have to swage them, so that is one more variable I don't have to deal with.

Frickman
If you're not broke down once in a while, you're not working hard enough

I'm not a hillbilly. I'm an "Appalachian American"

Retired  Conventional hand-felling logging operation with cable skidder and forwarder, Frick 01 handset sawmill

Pretend farmer when I have the time


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