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Author Topic: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife  (Read 5773 times)

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Offline ibseeker

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Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« on: February 14, 2008, 03:48:02 PM »
I'd  like to plant some hazelnut bushes and raspberries and blackberries for the wildlife and us. I've been told that blackberries can be very invasive and once established hard to control. I'll also be planting some pecans. The nursery site that I've been looking at is close to my property so I thought that would be good since the stock would be local and acclimated to the weather. They offer Apache, Arapahoe and Triple Crown, all thornless. How long will these vines live? The raspberries are Red Latham, Heritage and Caroline. The info says that it takes a couple of years for them to become established but also say " Two years are required to establish a raspberry planting, but once established, the planting can remain productive for several years if given good care."
How long do these types of berries live? Several years just doesn't sound right. Seems like you'd have to keep replanting them every 4 years or so. Does that make sense?
They offer the American Hazelnut but say it requires full sun to produce well. Anyone have any experience with hazelnut bushes?
The one thing holding me back from just ordering online and having them delivered is the quantity. I didn't really want 10 hazelnut bushes and each of the berry varieties come in groups of 6. I'm heading back to Maryville in mid-March for 3 weeks, should I just go to a local nursery and see what they have to offer?
Any suggestions, comments or questions?
Chuck
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2008, 05:47:57 PM »
Check with the local Conservation District for planting stock and planting advice. They are often a source for local planting stock with species suitable for the area.
~Ron

Offline ibseeker

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2008, 07:38:59 PM »
Who would the local Conservation District be associated with? Do you think the local State Forester would be able to guide me to them?
Obviously I'm unfamiliar with the resources available to me and that's something I'm going to work on learning more about.
Also the logger has finished his work and once I get some pictures I'll post them along with some history about how the logging went. So far from what I've heard from my FIL it went really well. He's happy with their work. I'll post more once I get back.
Chuck
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Offline Tom

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2008, 10:14:02 PM »
Look in the phone book under County Government and find the County agricultural Extension Office or County Agent.  He is a Gardener and should have some knowledge of nut and fruit trees.   Usually the county Forester can be found in that same office. 
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Offline rocksnstumps

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2008, 11:18:55 PM »
I would google Tennessee Wildlife Resouces Agency. I'm not familiar with your area to offer advice but have found that many of the state and university websites can have all sorts of pdf type documents that can be downloaded. As far as hazelnuts, don't be surprised if they look like they are almost dead after the end of the first growing season. They seem to put lots of energy into growing roots and come back with a lots of vigor the next spring with new shoots. I got mine thru some wildlife plantings offered tru the National Wild Turkey Federation

Offline OneWithWood

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2008, 11:23:00 AM »
To find your local conservation district look in the government pages of your local phone book.  Look for Soil and Water Conservation District.  It may be listed under state, county or US Government or all three.  How the districts are set up varies by state. 
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Offline ibseeker

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2008, 09:33:10 PM »
Thanks for all the advice, I'll start with a google search.

Rocksnstumps, did you plant the hazelnuts in full sun?

I might have some trouble finding a spot that won't get shaded by the regeneration from the logging. I'm leaning against planting blackberries, a couple of friends have said that blackberries are quick to take over an area and hard to get rid of or control.
The goal is to draw in some of the local wildlife, turkey, bear  and deer. Plus I like hazelnuts. How are pecans for wildlife? English walnut? We sowed 200 #'s of winter wheat in October but I haven't seen how it did since. I'll know more next month and hope to have some photo's to share of the logging and the fall sowing. I've been having trouble adding photo's to my post so I'll have to go through Jeff's tuturial and figure out what I'm doing wrong. I'll get it. I know how much photo's are appreciated.

Any other suggestions for nut trees?

Any other suggestions for making the forest more attractive for wildlife?
Chuck
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Offline rocksnstumps

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2008, 11:11:36 PM »
Yes, the hazelnuts are in part of an old pasture out in the open. Only planted them a few years ago, so they still have some growing to do.
If you don't mind checking out some other forums, there's a good thread on wildlife tree planting on the iowawhitetail.com site. Search for one titled "tree planting" by someone called dbltree. I'm not a big deer hunter, but some of the sites out there have some interesting info on wildlife plantings and lots of pictures of their progress.
I'm sure pecans would go over well with the critters as well, but the heck with them, I'm ready for some pee-can pie as one of the fellas from Mississippi would say back when I worked in Memphis for a few years. "Mud pie" was pretty good too. Mmmmm.....pie (Homer Simpson moment)

Offline ibseeker

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2008, 11:33:36 AM »
I'll definitely be getting my share of whatever nuts that these trees produce. I'll check out some other sites. I've given up on most of the other forestry based forums. The FF has become my main source of information and so far I've gotten very good advice and have learned a great deal from other posts. Besides that, the folks on here have such a great sense of humor that I come here for entertainment too.

The wildlife planting is just for support of the local critters. I don't hunt anything anymore. I enjoy fishing far more than hunting.....except quail hunting and that's really difficult to do in San Diego.

The other benefit from this planting is that I finally get to PLANT something. All I've done so far is cut stuff down. That's not a bad thing but I'm looking forward to planting.
Chuck
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Offline WDH

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2008, 09:10:44 PM »
Dogwood produces a red fruit that is an important soft mast in the fall for wildlife.  Also, red mulberry produces a tasty berry, both for the wildlife and for us too!  Check out his post if you have not seen it already.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,25639.0.html

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Offline ibseeker

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Re: Planting fruit & nut trees for wildlife
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2008, 12:19:20 PM »
WDH, there are many dogwoods in my forest and I'm trying to save every one. Dogwoods are an interesting species, I had no idea there were so many different types. I didn't consider mulberry trees but based upon your suggestion I'll see what's available locally and what the Conservation District says about them. My next door neighbor here in San Diego has a big one. I was the designated mulberry leaf gatherer for my daughter's first grade class when they were raising silkworms. That was a fun time, the kids were very excited about that project.

One of these days I will be able to spend time in the forest when the fruit bearing species are producing. I still haven't seen the dogwoods in bloom.
Chuck
worn out poulan, Stihl 250SC, old machete and a bag of clues with a hole in the bottom


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