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Author Topic: Railroad Ties  (Read 4924 times)

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Offline GF

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Railroad Ties
« on: March 06, 2008, 08:17:58 AM »
I had a person contact me wanting me to cut some old railroad ties.  I turned the person down but was wondering what you may run into when cutting them?  I can imagine embedded rocks would be one issue.  Thanks

Gary

Offline Kelvin

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2008, 08:20:54 AM »
Yowzaa!  I wouldn't cut one with my chainsaw let alone my sawmill.  If it would cut, it would kill you with the creasote you'd be breathing.  They also have those metal "s" things imbedded in the end, but i guess you could pry them out.  I'd rather saw telephone poles, at least they were out of the ground.  Can't think of anything worse!  Also all the toxic waste would be in your sawdust pile unless you went to him.

Offline ely

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2008, 09:30:39 AM »
exactly what kelvin said, but i would not be afraid to saw one of them that i picked out myself. once upon a  time they did hack out walnut for railroad ties. but as a rule i would say no deal.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2008, 08:41:02 PM »
I made some steps out of old RR ties.I used a chainsaw to cut them to lenght.There is ALOT of gravel and stones in them cracks.The gravel part I feel is the worse.Don't even see a power washer being much help.Just drive in into the cracks deeper.Cut one and have to sharpen the chain.I don't see how you could cut them on a bandsaw mill without almost destoying the blade.I would turn them down too.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline beav39

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2008, 09:15:38 PM »
good choice to to that job down not much profit to be had in sawing ties to much debris in them
sawdust in the blood

Offline Brad_S.

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2008, 10:25:08 PM »
Uh-oh. You mean I shouldn't have accepted this resawing job? ;)
 
"Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." J. Lennon

Offline Warren

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2008, 01:19:06 PM »
Hopefully you are doing that job on location on a time and materials basis...
LT40SHD42, Case 1845C, W&S Forklift, Baker Edger ...  And not near enough time in the day ...

Offline semologger

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2008, 02:53:32 PM »
family been in cresote business a long time none died yet from it. Ive worked the edger hole many times cutting them. In the 95 degree summer time wearing a long sleave shirt.  Telephone poles have CCA or Penta in them also that aint the nicest stuff either. Those things in them are spikes. They are used to hold down the track to the tie. Old dried out white oak is hard thats for sure. Dad had to shrapen the sawblade pretty often. Im glad them days are over. I feal sorry for you Brad. I hope you dont need any help.

Offline tcsmpsi

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2008, 05:02:33 PM »
I suppose what I'm missing is, what would be the need to mill used railroad ties? 

I can hardly imagine that going to the touble with them would gain as much as they were worth. 

Maybe I've handled too many of them, hauled too many through ditches, briars, snakes, mud,  etc.  and just have an all out aversion to them. 
\\\"In the end, it is a moral question as to whether man applies what he has learned or not.\\\" - C. Jung

Offline Brad_S.

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2008, 05:51:37 PM »
There is no way I would ever cut one tie, much less that stack! I was just impressed with the pile they got going there, so I snapped a photo.
"Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." J. Lennon

Offline tcsmpsi

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2008, 06:30:00 PM »
There's no doubt there.  That IS an impressive stack of ties.  My back is tired just seeing it.   :D

I knew you wouldn't be cutting into any of them, Brad.   ;D
\\\"In the end, it is a moral question as to whether man applies what he has learned or not.\\\" - C. Jung

Offline olyman

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2008, 01:44:46 PM »
They are cuttable--but i do it with a 10 1/4 circular saw. With a carbide blade. And the rocks in them will cut with carbide, just cant be in a hurry----but with a bandsaw--uh uh

Offline semologger

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Re: Railroad Ties
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2008, 11:19:57 PM »
The S in them are called S irons. I remember dad driveing them in With a sledge hammer driving them in. It keeps the tie from splitting. Them finaly made an machine to put them in.


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