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Author Topic: A peek at my sawbooth  (Read 17104 times)

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Offline Jeff

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2001, 06:35:13 PM »
I only see the out of doors every 3 hours at break. I know everybody's job has it's downfalls.

Here is what you can do to get a good idea of a sawyers day.

Go in your smallest bathroom (Without windows), put the lid down on the stool, sit down. Now start swinging your arms back and forth steadily,  and tap your feet alternately on occasion. Now do this for 9 hours, stopping once at midday to flush.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Offline CHARLIE

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2001, 06:47:40 PM »
OK, I'm off to the bathroom to swing my arms and tap my feet. I just hope I can remember to come out of there after nine hours. This is gonna be fun! 8) 8) 8)
Charlie
"Everybody was gone when I arrived but I decided to stick around until I could figure out why I was there !"

Offline Jeff

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2001, 07:48:19 PM »
Private message from Charlie:

Quote
Jeff, can I come out of the bathroom yet? I've lost track of time and don't know if my 9 hours is up yet, but my arms and feet are getting mighty tired. It's been fun though, but I think my wife things I'm a bit strange and is tired of me hogging the bathroom. ;D


Yes Charlie, you may come out.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Ezekiel 22:30

Offline CHARLIE

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2001, 08:07:03 PM »
Whew! Thanks Jeff!  And my wife thanks you too just like all good children do. ;D
Charlie
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Offline Gordon

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2001, 12:02:01 PM »
Charlie you make me laugh. That was a hoot.  ;D ;D ;D

I know for a fact I couldn't stay in the booth all day every day. Not an easy job.

Gordon

Offline Bibbyman

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2001, 05:20:50 PM »
Here is a picture I took at the Midwest Forest Industry Show of the command station on the new Wood-Mizer LT300.  Don't even have to use your feet!   8)



For more pictures I took at the show,  try this link.

http://www.cartogra.com/home/ViewMyAlbum.asp?coll_id=1050860
Wood-Mizer LT40HDE25 Super 25hp 3ph with Command Control and Accuset.
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Offline Jeff

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2001, 05:26:56 PM »
Now your Stylin.

When you gettin yours?
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Ezekiel 22:30

Offline Don P

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2001, 06:16:30 PM »
Nice pics! Are the controls the same basic layout as Jeff's?
The outfeed shots were very informative. Thats definitely my bottleneck, well other than the infeed  :D :D
I am curious, the Amish were crowding  around the LT300, do they not frown on the electrical controls, I do just cause I get lost with my 2.(throttle and feed) ;D
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline Bibbyman

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2001, 08:41:19 PM »
I'm always curious about the Amish and Mennonites.  We have quite a verity around here and they all have somewhat different rules..  We have "Black bumper" Mennonites that can drive cars but they have to paint over all the chrome.  Then we have some "iron wheel Mennonites" that has about every thing anyone else has but they can't have inflated tires.  Really odd to see a new combine or tractor going down the road with iron wheels or a nice brick ranch house with a John Deere riding lawn mower setting on the lawn with iron wheels.   :o

Early last winter I talked a long time with a young Amish man that was a logger.  He wanted to get into the sawmill business. Saw him again Saturday.  (He lives on the western side of Missouri and the show was in St. Charles - just outside of St. Louis.  That's a long way in a buggy!)  He'd just got a new Wood-Mizer LT40 Super Hydraulic mill and had it running five days.  12v DC was all right but he could not use the hydraulic pump so he converted it over to air over hydraulic.  Said there was oil in lines and cylinders but was powered by air.  Don't know how that would work.   He had all kinds of plans for support equipment and automation - just had to be powered the right way.  ;)

I sold my blade sharpener to some Amish brothers that removed the 110ac converter and run it off 12v dc.   ::)

I've heard that Amish won't use mules to farm with because they are not natural animals as they are a hybrid.  But with the market for mules being good, they will raise them from their draft horse mares and train them - or take them as colts from others and train them. One thing in common,  they have no problem with making money. ;D

And yes,  I did note more then one Amish man climb up in the control chair and get detailed instructions on how it all worked.  They really looked it over and asked a lot of questions.  I think they were more than curious about the mill,   I think they were interested.  
:o
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Offline CHARLIE

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #29 on: September 24, 2001, 10:44:14 AM »
There's quite a few Amish in Minnesota too and sometimes I get confused about what they can and can't do. They have horses and wagons, no cars or tractors. But they can catch a ride to town in the nonAmish neighbor's car. They can't have a telephone but they can use the nonAmish neighbor's telephone. They can't have a TV, but they can watch the nonAmish neighbor's TV.  I thought they weren't supposed to use bright colors, but I saw a couple of 'em fishing in the Root River once with brand new spinning rods with chartreuse or international orange colored lures. :-/  

I've seen an Amish woodworking shop. They remove all electric motors and run all the saws, jointers, etc using big canvas belts attached to pulleys on one long shaft which is turned using a gasoline engine (not sure why they can use a gasoline engine but can't have a tractor or car.::) )

The Amish sell a lot of nice oak furniture and cabinets here in these parts. People also hire them to help them dismantle old barns or homes.
Charlie
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Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2001, 04:03:46 PM »
Quite a few Amish, Mennonite, and Bretheran in my area.  I have worked for each.  I live on the fringe of the Pennsylvania Dutch Amish area, but they are also in the central portion of the state.  Wherever there is farmland, that is reasonably priced.

What the Amish can and can't have will depend on their church.  If they don't like it, they can start their own church.  A church has a minimum of 6 families.

I've seen Amish with no electric in the house, but had electric to the barn.  That's where they kept the deep freeze and refrigerator.  Then there are Amish that have no electric.

They often have a telephone at someone else's farm.  Often there is a building at a neighbor's farm.  I call them an Amish phone booth.  I spoke to one Amishman and remarked that there was a lock on the door.  He told me "the Amish, we trust".  Calls were written down and each month they would pay their bill.

I know one Amish logger who bought a truck for another guy to haul logs.  He paid all expenses, just couldn't have any vehicles in his name.  The same goes for vans that haul the Amish all over.

Most Amish mills run on hydraulic power, in my area.  One of the big hydraulic repair and parts shop is run by Amish.  They have now upgraded to having hydraulic engineers on staff.

One of the largest mills in the state is owned by an Amishman.  I've never been through the mill, but it runs like all other mills.  Has 440 electric.  I don't know how he has sidestepped the church.
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Offline Bibbyman

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #31 on: September 24, 2001, 07:40:50 PM »
We have a large Amish community north of us in Missouri.  Mennonites and Amish to the south and others scattered here and there.  You can drive through the area to the north and they have all kinds of bakeries, harness shops, buggy shops.  All expected.  But what you don't expect is the auto body shops,  HVIC shops,  and the sawmills and pallet factories.  

Mary worked with an Amish lady last week at a large,  national,  five-day draft horse and mule auction.  Sometime during the week,  the Amish lady pulled a ticket out of her purse and showed it to Mary.  It was from the observation deck of the WTC in NY one week before the September,11 tragedy.  After the auction, she and her husband was booked to fly to Seattle and then tour of Alaska and Canada.

Mary loves to shop at a Mennonite grocery store south of us.  They continue to expand and most of their products are now bar-coded.  :o
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Offline Don P

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #32 on: September 24, 2001, 08:37:06 PM »
I think I lit a fire and left.
I didn't realize there were so many groups or factions in the faith. We only have one group at home and they use horsepower for everything, 2 to saw pine 4 for oak. The solar kiln fans are powered by the spring. I was only given basic directions when I was told they may be interested in my services but the iron wheel tracks on the pavement and "road apples" led me right to the door. We didn't see eye to eye, (yes you build to code) but thats the beauty of the country, room for both. They do seem to be good people, I would have a hard time working that hard in the face of ease.
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An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #33 on: September 25, 2001, 03:47:06 PM »
The Amish I've been around really do work in ease.  They don't have a lot of the trappings we do.

They have hot water, electric where they need it, kerosene lights that are as bright as electric, and farms that are paid for.  They keep this way of life to keep the kids out of trouble (so I've been told).  They usually lack education, and often that hurts them.

I was amazed how quickly they can park a buggy and get the horse in the barn.  Actually, the horse goes in by himself.  It was no slower than parking a car.  And they don't have to worry about gas or insurance.

We did have an Amish buggy going through all the stop signs in one town, without stopping.  It was pretty late at night.  The town cops stopped traffic and finally got the buggy stopped.  In the back, an Amishman was as drunk as a skunk.  The horse was the designated driver.  The Amishman got busted for drunk driving.   :D

We even had a few Amish boys busted for dealing in cocaine.  Seems they met a few of the Pagan motorcycle club members when out on a construction job.  Started dealing to their friends.  The court gave them a sentence, then the church took care of them.
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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #34 on: September 25, 2001, 06:15:01 PM »
Yea,  I was setting in the car while Mary was shopping in an Amish bakery.   The bakery was really an extension of the farmhouse.  While I was waiting,  an Amish boy about 12 climbed up on a big farm wagon pulled buy four big Belgian horses.  The boy backed the wagon into the barn a pretty as you please.  :o I couldn't have backed a Radio Flyer any better.   :-/

The first Wood-Mizer mill I every saw in real life was owned by an Amish man.  Eli and his sons had and old LT30 set up under some trees across the road from his house.  I visited with him and actually negotiated to buy his mill before I bought a new one.  I have stopped in several times since and visited with him.  One time I told him I'd just like to watch how they did things and stood in the log yard out of the way.  Eli had a couple of Belgians hitched to a sled he used to skid logs to the skid blocks.  They stood there an hour with their lines thrown over their backs not moving from their tracks except to swat a horsefly or two.  Eli went out and rolled a log on the sled and went "Chic-Chic" and the Belgians stepped up and pull the sled to the skid blocks.  The lines were thrown back over their backs and they were still standing there when I left a half-hour latter.

While I have also seen some Amish and Mennonites display the bad habits of the world and have heard of worse stories,  most I find are gentle and hard working.  ::)

This one young Amish man I referred to in an earlier post had talked to me several times about my Wood-Mizer mill.  We visited quite a lot and I felt comfortable asking him some dumb questions about the rules in his community.  He was polite and answered them.  The last visit he made,  he brought his young wife.  He wanted her to see just what he was talking about getting.  He urged her forward and explained the mill to her and what he was going to do when he got his.   I didn't need him to translate the look on her face!  I've seen it a thousand times - arms crossed,  one foot stuck out in advance of the other with toe tapping,  jaw set,  lips tightly pressed,  eyes slightly squinted.  To her it was a MAN THING  >:(  - something big and orange that made noise and tore things up.  

As I said,  I seen him again last Saturday and he got his mill - a new Wood-Mizer LT40HD42D Super.  I didn't see his wife. :o
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Offline Gordon

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #35 on: September 25, 2001, 06:25:58 PM »
We have a pretty good amount of  Amish in this area. One of my good friends is Amish. It's amazing the trouble they go through not to be vain. But they really skirt the rules of the church.

Can't own an item with air in the rubber tires in this area. So what does he do for a tractor. Has a Kubota in his English drivers name. But now I've found him an ASV positrac on the internet. What that is a rubber tracked tractor sort of like a bobcat with tracks.

He owns his own carpentry business. His crew really busts  butt at work and they get paid well for it. They are all Amish men except for the English driver. Oh and the driver lives right down the street from him and that is where the deep freeze is at.

The homestead he has built is beautiful. A beautiful house that is wired for electric but has blank plates over all of the outlets. The reason he did this is just in case he wants to sell down the road it's open for anyone not just an Amish man. Also a carriage house, horse barn, wood shop and large implement shed. on 24 acres. Just bought 125 acres to deer hunt on in the eastern shore of MD. All cash money and he is 33 years old. A real hard worker.

What really gets me is his wood shop. He bought all new delta electric tools for the shop and took all of the electric motors off and installed air noters on them. Except for the plainer and the table saw they are run by hydraulic. The air and fluid are from a yanmar diesel. He has three large old propane tanks that are for air storage. This way if only using the well pump {air powered} he only has to start the diesel once a week to pump up the air pressure.

If anyone is interested in some brand new electric motors they are for sale.

Quite a different way to live. But I can say this the anti skid that they weld onto the horse shoes in this area really tears up the roads. The good thing is that the buggies have lights on them. Much easier to see than just the SMV sign on the back.

They just got the little phone booths a couple of years ago. Quite an event for them.

Shew-- I beat the refresh clock 8)

Gordon

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #36 on: September 26, 2001, 03:23:22 PM »
Bibbyman:

Do your Amish speak Dutch or have they lost that?  All the Amish speak it, as do many Mennonites and Bretheran.  Some of the older people speak it, but it is being lost on the young kids.

My Dad could speak a little bit, and it helped him out quite a bit in WWII.  My Grandparents (Mom's side) didn't speak English until grade school.  They didn't pass on the PA Dutch to their kids.
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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #37 on: September 26, 2001, 05:59:26 PM »
Yea, Ron, that was one of he questions I asked my new Amish friend.  

We had visited with the Amish families some and all the little kids just stood quietly by and smiled up at me.  Normally,  kids talk my ear off.  I asked him if they were taught to not speak to outsiders or did they not speak English.  He said they were taught German (Dutch?) at home and would only latter pick up English.  But they probably could understand me.  

Said also they were taught not to speak when elders are talking.   ;D
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Offline Don P

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2001, 07:34:17 PM »
Sounds like they're just non electric baptists, Dad always told us to been seen and not heard,  I must be making up for lost time. ;D

They must be speaking German (Deutsh) , Michelle is from Dutch stock and doesn't recall any Amish.

I've chopped holes for 26 electric boxes the last 2 days. That off grid living is sounding ok at the moment. :D

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Re: A peek at my sawbooth
« Reply #39 on: September 27, 2001, 03:35:13 PM »
Pennsylvania Dutch are Germans.  The Dutch part is Anglicized for Deutsch.  It is a low German and a lot of English has been put in.

In our area, a heavy German accent is still evident in a lot of our pronounciations.  Much of it is being lost, thanks to TV.

For example, I never heard of Swiss cheese when I was growing up.  It was always called Schweitzer cheese.  That's German for Swiss.

If you want some real fun with those kids, get them seperate from their parents.  They'll talk your ear off.  They're really curious about the outsiders.
Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large groups.


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