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Author Topic: Toothed hand plane blade  (Read 4705 times)

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Offline beenthere

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Toothed hand plane blade
« on: May 20, 2009, 12:49:34 PM »
While wandering YouTube, I ran across this video of the toothed blade. I wasn't aware of it. Looks cool.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pxKo1vjOwA&NR=1
south central Wisconsin
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Offline LeeB

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2009, 03:31:48 PM »
I just read about it this morning in Wood magazine. Is that about a normal speed for using a hand plane? I never have gone that fast with my passes.
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, JD 3032 tractor, JD 5410 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2009, 05:37:01 PM »
I'd like to get a toothed iron for one of my planes. The sycamore I've been playing with tears out pretty badly. Those L-N tools are amazing. I can get good results from my old Stanleys, but I'd be better off spending the money on the L-N and using my time to work on a project.

Fast is the way to go with a plane, light passes with a sharp tool. 8)
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Offline thedeeredude

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2009, 06:41:35 PM »
Toothed blades have been around since at least the 18th century.  At that time they were mounted in a smooth plane sized stock and usually the blades were held vertical at a 90 angle acting like a scraper.  Now with the availability of low angle planes, it makes perfect sense to use one.  I've never used a toothed blade but have played around with the Lie Nielsen planes, I think I've only used a number 5 and a 4-1/2 but boy were they nice.  I think I have to stimulate the Maine economy and get a low angle jack soon 8)

Offline Modat22

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2009, 08:44:24 AM »
I've been watching those blades in leevalley. Isn't their main purpose for glue faces?
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Offline Fla._Deadheader

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2009, 09:04:35 AM »

  BT, how about a photo for us Video challenged ???
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Offline Modat22

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2009, 09:11:08 AM »
remember man that thy are dust.

Offline Dan_Shade

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2009, 09:51:51 AM »
my understanding is that a glue face should be as flat as possible, and not scuffed up.


those things look sweet to work a board down quickly.
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Offline Fla._Deadheader

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2009, 11:03:54 AM »

 Gracias Modat.  8)
All truth passes through three stages:
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Offline Modat22

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2009, 11:13:41 AM »
found this interesting use for the toothed plane blade

http://www.andrewcarruthers.com/Images/Shavings/source/3.htm

Planing deeply figured maple ribs can be tricky; half of each stroke is cutting up into end grain and the wood tends to tear out. To get around this problem an early genius invented the toothed plane blade. The back edge of the blade has a series of parallel grooves so that the cutting edge is notched. As it cuts, the wood between the mini blades is torn and this prevents larger tears from forming.  To finish the rib a cabinet scraper is used or, for a better finish, a very fine set plane is used very delicately. 

Toothed plane marks can often be found on the inside of ribs and occasionally a few can be seen on the outside. Many French makers used very fine toothed planes when trimming their rib structures for fitting the back and top plates.
remember man that thy are dust.

Offline LeeB

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2009, 02:52:37 PM »
The magazine article I read said it was for planing difficult, easy to tear out woods.
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, JD 3032 tractor, JD 5410 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2009, 04:23:16 PM »
Historically toothing planes were used to prepare glue surfaces when gluing veneer to solid wood.  The idea was that the glue would bond better when the surface had more texture to it.  Modern adhesive research shows that this is not the case, so there's not much point in surfacing veneer substrate with a toothing plane other than for historical accuracy.  On the other hand, the other use of the toothing plane, which is shown in that video, is still very much a practical application.  Chris Schwarz just did an interesting story on it at his blog.
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Offline Ironwood

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2009, 10:18:05 AM »
Depends upon the glue, epoxies NEED to have a void to fill, unlike hide (white glues also) which need perfectly mating surfaces.

           Ironwood
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Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: Toothed hand plane blade
« Reply #13 on: May 26, 2009, 08:37:56 AM »
Right, but who uses epoxy to apply veneer? ???
"There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey." -John Ruskin

Any idiot can write a woodworking blog. Here's mine.


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