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Author Topic: Positioning logs for bucking  (Read 7998 times)

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Offline Adamj

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Positioning logs for bucking
« on: September 10, 2003, 05:57:26 PM »
I would appreciate some tips on positioning felled logs for bucking.  I have a 9" cant hook with dixie log jack.  However, this tool does not work well for moving larger logs to a good cutting position.  I am have trouble with logs having diameters of 18-26 inches.  I want to avoid putting the chain in the soil.  Your guideance is much appreciated.  

Offline David_c

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2003, 08:44:13 PM »
i have one of those cant hooks with a stand lifts logs right off the ground. 8)

Offline Tom

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2003, 09:35:06 PM »
Put a branch or 4x4 or something like that next to the log and use your cant hook to roll the log up on it.  It will give you the clearance you desire. :)
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Offline burlman

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2003, 09:17:13 PM »
 I'm guessing that you are cutting firewood. cut your large ones as close as you dare to the ground, continue down the bole to the end. now use your cant hook and turn it a least a  quarter turn and finish your cuts through. I have tried one of those lifters, It went in the garage sale soon after. I like a couple of limbs under the trunk and roll the log up on them that gets you a few cuts right through th log....burlman...

Offline David_c

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2003, 09:26:50 PM »
you know burlman i have noticed i dont much like the lifter either you have to keep moving it and it gets to be a pain i thought it would be nice not. i have actually went back to the way you just mentioned saves time and energy.

Offline blue_eyed_devil

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2003, 12:12:09 AM »
My buddy made his own lifter,welding a cant hook to a peice of two inch pipe.It has a small stand that lifts the log no problem.Works great.....and it was the first time I ever saw such a device.
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Offline Minnesota_boy

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2003, 01:52:44 PM »
You guys are doing this all wrong.  You should choose a tree like balsam fir or white spruce that come with log supports attached (limbs).  I've seen white spruce with the bole supported up to 6 feet or more from the ground.  Sometimes you can't even reach the bole.  :D :D
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Offline rebocardo

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2003, 06:39:59 PM »
I use my hi-lift jack to lift the log and shove a piece of timber, trunk, or branch under it at least 12 inches wide. Sometime I wrap a chain or cable around the log, if it is say 20+ feet long, attach a shackle, and then lift the shackle with the hi-lift jack. Sometime I will sink a 1/2 lag with a length of chain and a shackle for the hi-lift jack if I can not get a chain around it. Especially if it is sitting flat on the ground.

Note, never reach under a log! If it shifts or you meet a wee creature you might regret it. I shove the chain under the log with a metal pole and reach over the log, while on the uphill side, and pull the chain or cable through.

Same with the hi-lift jack, when using it you make sure you are on the uphill side with your foot at the base of the jack. Never let go of the handle, especially when lowering the load.

I usually shove a couple of cut pieces under the log along the length and as I work my way down I knock a supporting piece out so I never have the log I am bucking supported on both ends of the cut. I always cut so the log will easily fall away and I have at least 6-12 inches under the cut so it falls cleanly away and does not snag the bar or the piece cut will not hit the nose on the next cut (kickback).

I try to have the log off the ground before I cut the branches off so I have a lot of room between my bar and ground. Then I clear the branches away and cut/buck the trunk to length. That way I avoid tripping hazards and the cut pieces get to roll away.


Offline blue_eyed_devil

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2003, 10:23:21 PM »
"Never let go of the handle"
A friend of mine did that once, the jack $*&#kicked him with about 5 uppercuts to the jaw before launching him into orbit.
I think they should rename them, farmer-killer jacks.
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Offline Oregon_Rob

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2003, 06:26:19 AM »
While you guys work up a sweat running to the truck and setting jacks, chains.... and lifting logs. I will have cut 7/8's the way through, rolling it over, finished the cut and have the wood split split and stacked, about the time you start your first cut. 8)
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Offline Bro. Noble

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2003, 07:27:29 AM »
Along with what Rob said,  Look for a place that you want to cut that is a little off the ground already and start there.  After you get the stem into two or more pieces it is easier to roll.

You don't have to cut plumb to the soil.  After you use a saw awhile,  you know where the bar is even if you can't see it.  When you get close to completing the cut,  watch the sawdust for a change in color.  When it turns dark,  you're in the bark so stop. Now,  I'll have to admit that this isn't 100% foolproof :-[ and I'm glad my son is good at grinding chain. ;D

I've used a chainsaw forever and was thinking I was pretty handy with one till we sold some walnut last year.  The buyer wanted the stem on the ground when he came but wanted to help decide how to buck them.  I learned a lot not only about where the logs should be cut,  but also how to buck a log without damaging wood.  I thought I was doing well but he kept saying stuff like "better cut that from the bottom or that suckers gonna split"  I was having trouble with a cut where the log was wanting to pinch the saw.  He asked if I minded if he tried that.  I then saw how logs are supposed to be bucked.

I guess what I'm trying to say is you might want to watch someone for a little while that's a pro.  
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Offline MrMoo

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2003, 07:58:26 AM »
Adam,
I was bucking logs this past weekend.
With Hemlock I let the branches support it. I try to cut the sapwood first and then finish with the heartwood. If everything goes right I do not damage the log.
With logs on the ground I will keep some 3" diameter branches around and use the cant hook to roll the log up onto it and then cut it. I still try to cut around the outer portions of the log as much as possible but sometimes that is hard if its too close to the ground.
If the log is too heavy I'll get a chain around it & use the backhoe to pick it up onto something and then cut it.
I always watch to be careful which way the logs will move once cut especially when they are up off the ground. I don't like surprises.
Mike

Offline Tom

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2003, 09:16:16 AM »
A trick I use sometimes on bigger logs (smaller than the bar), that is slightly suspended, is to start a plunge cut midway of the log and cut through the bottom.  Then start at the top and cut through to meet the first cut. When the log parts and falls, the top closes and leaves the saw free to be taken out.

This is what "Bows" are really good for and what they were designed to do.  You don't have to bend over and the log pinches in the opening in the bow rather than bar and chain.  The spur hits the ground first and you just rock the bow forward a little and it cuts through the log. A little finesse and you never hit the dirt.

It's too bad that they have gotten such a bad reputation.  All because operators didn't use due caution, I'm afraid.
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Offline Gus

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2003, 11:16:24 AM »
Right on Oregon_Rob
No tools needed just roll `er over and finish the cuts. 8)
Gus
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Offline Adamj

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Re: Positioning logs for bucking
« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2003, 05:57:33 PM »
Thanks for all the good advice.  However, I think that a little work on my levitation skills would be most helpful.  Levitation works for Yoda and David Copperfield.   ;D


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