The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service

Dynamic Green Products Inc.





Author Topic: Deer meat processing  (Read 10060 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sandhills

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5117
  • Age: 47
  • Location: east egde of the hills, Albion, Nebraska
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2010, 09:53:06 AM »
Larry, I like the idea of skinning it first, have to try that next time the hair is what bothers me the most during butchering. 

How do you process a deer without skinning it 1st? ??? that is a new one to me. I like to skin it while warm if possible and then it can hang. Perfect temperatures right now for that here, I have one in my garage now. If it hangs for several days 32-36 degrees I find the meat is better. If you mix a little ground beef/beef fat with it it will make a much better burger, it just takes a little but it will make it a lot moister when you cook it.
I was reffering to the part where he said they skinned before feild dressing it, we've always feild dressed then hung them and skinned them.

Online beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 26932
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #21 on: November 24, 2010, 11:32:38 AM »
sandhills
That was my interp too.

We (until this year) could not skin until the deer was registered. Now this year the rules are different, and the deer can be in up to 5 parts when registering.

When I've skinned in the past, I keep as much hair off the meat as possible and then use the torch to singe any remaining hair. I worried about the scorched hair tainting the meat, but in the end didn't have any problem.

Now I have a local butcher process my deer. They do a good job boning and trimming all the fat off the loins and roasts. The trim is separate and I go through that to sort out meat for stew-sized workup, and make sure the trim that is left is suitable for sausage making. I don't put anything into sausage that I wouldn't cook in a pan and put on my plate.

Had a hunting buddy who had a large band saw in his wood shop. He boasted one year about the perfect and fast way to process his deer.
Skinned (after field dressing) and put the carcass in the freezer. When frozen, he would hoist it up and run it through his band saw to cut into steaks and chops. (bone, bone dust, fat, and all) He said the only downside was cleaning the bandsaw after he was done.   That was until his wife let him know that he wasn't going to fix their venison anymore like that !!   ;D
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline WH_Conley

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4088
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Camp Dix, Ky.
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to tide my profile!
    • Share Post
    • Stone Hill Hardwoods
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #22 on: November 24, 2010, 01:28:54 PM »
I have a neighbor that was getting ready to quarter a deer, he used to drink some in those days. Picked up a chainsaw, stuck the nose through and came up with it. Emptied  the garage of all his buddies real quick. Course this is the same guy that had an electric motor with a noisy bearing, poured about a pint of oil in it, right before the magic smoke came out.
Bill

Offline Rancher

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 86
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Fairplay, Colo
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #23 on: November 24, 2010, 01:29:55 PM »
I have out of state buds that come here to hunt elk. They have a pretty good head start on processing since most states now insist that all the elk be boned before they can take it home. Helps me out a bit at times when they are in a hurry and don't want to do it all. I can always make the sacrifice and put some in my freezer.
Dave
If you're honest you don't have to trust your memory.

Offline Silverfoxfintry

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 18
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Stirlingshire Scotland
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2020, 06:53:30 AM »
Hello from Scotland.
I Have a chiller for hanging my carcasses in. It cycles between +4 & +7 degrees Centigrade.
I get the Deer into it ASAP after shooting them. I usually leave the skin on until I am ready to butcher them.
I can hang them for up to 21 days before skinning and butchering.
All fat is removed along with heavy membrane before packing into portions for the freezer.
In Scotland, best practice is to clean the carcass in the field. As soon as possible after the shot.
It makes recovery a lot easier and cuts down possible contamination.
Of course we donít have large carnivores who might dispute ownership!
Take care
Silverfox.

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8857
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2020, 11:44:17 AM »
   It is interesting when a 10 year old thread like this wakes up.

   I am different than many because I am hunting on my property close to where the deer will be processed. I never field dress my deer. I find they skin much easier and stay cleaner if I don't. I throw them on my ATV and drive between the uprights on my skinning rack, weigh them on a set of spring scales I keep there then put my gambrel through their hocks and lift with a block and tackle I keep there year round. I skin the deer cutting off the head and forelegs so the hide slips right off. I used to let them hang overnight to let them chill to make processing easier. I try to shoot them when the weather is just above freezing but below 40* F at night then debone and process the next morning. If it will be freezing I hang them in a nearby log barn where I can keep them just above freezing. 

   The last one I processed may be the way I do them from now on. I processed as I went along. I pulled the backstrap, cut off the shoulders and trimmed much of the side meat for grinding. Then I gutted the deer and washed out the cavity as needed. Then I cut the backbone below the ribs and took the front half and cut the brisket and such off and trimmed as much more meat as I can for grinding. Then I separate the hams at the hip by cutting at the ball socket. I pulled the tenderloins and put the hams in the fridge to cool overnight then separate the muscles the next day more by pulling them apart than by cutting and cut into steaks for cubing. I removed as much fat and silverskin as I could during skinning and as I pulled the muscle groups off the hams. I leave the neck whole/bone in for a roast. I separate the shoulders at the ball joints and leave them bone in for roasts. I corn the backstraps, tenderloin and briskets and grind the trimmings for sausage mixed 4:1 with pork or I can it.

   I do not hang/age my deer like many have mentioned before. I feel most gamey taste people complain about is just waiting too long to process or improper processing of their deer. I do let it chill, preferably just overnight, as I find the muscles cut easier then but that is the limit to my "aging". If its too warm to chill outside I put in one of our spare fridges to cool then work it up.

    When making bulk sausage we make meatballs with an ice cream scoop, put them in a vacuum bag then flatten into patties inside the bag then vacuum and seal. For burgers, which we rarely do, I just start with bigger meatballs and flatten in the bag.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline SawyerTed

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1632
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Germanton, NC
  • Gender: Male
  • Summey Lumber Services, LLC
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2020, 03:20:33 PM »
Much like Howard, I hunt my own property and am minutes from the house.   From the harvest to the time the deer is in a cooler on ice is usually less than an hour.  I age on ice similar to methods mentioned previously.  Normally I donít field dress unless the deer is what we consider a big one OR it has found itís way into a place I canít get to with my four wheeler and have to drag one out up hill a long distance.

We peel our deer using the golf ball method so the amount of hair on the meat is minimized.  We also hang deer by the neck for dressing unless it is a trophy destined for the taxidermist.  Hanging by the neck and peeling keeps hair off the prime cuts of meat and, if gutting the deer, minimizes the chance of large quantities of tainted meat from an accidental bladder or intestines puncture.

Iíve found some around here ďageĒ their deer in less than ideal conditions which creates a gamey taste my family does not like.  I do age my quarters and back straps on ice a day or two.  I have mine processed at a local meat processor.  It isnít unusual for the deer to be on ice in my cooler inside their meat cooler for another two or three days.  At all times I keep the meat out of the water and covered with ice.  

Weíve tried processing at home.  The time, space and equipment necessary to do it correctly at home is costly compared to having it done.  It is a convenience to have the processor 6 miles from home.  The owners of the meat processing facility are young neighbors and I donít mind supporting their operation.  Processing, grinding, slicing, sausage making, vacuum packaging and labeling is about $1 per pound on average.  Gives me more time in the woods, on the lake or at the sawmill.  Three of us usually ďtag outĒ annually so that would be lots of processing.
Woodmizer LT35HD25, WM BMS 250, WM BMT 250, Kubota MX5100, IH McCormick Farmall 140, Husqvarna 372XP, Husqvarna 455 Rancher, Ram 3500 6.7 Cummins

Offline WDH

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 30806
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Perry, GA
  • Gender: Male
  • April 1998 - August 2008
    • Share Post
    • hamsleyhardwood.com
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2020, 06:00:07 PM »
Howard, I know that you know, but deer do not have ball joints at the shoulders. 

I skin and quarter the deer along with removing all the other meat from the carcass, put in a good cooler, fill with ice, open the drain hole on the cooler, put the cooler under the shed at the barn, and keep on ice for a week.  Then I process by grinding and cubing.  My deer never have a gamey taste. 
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8857
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #28 on: November 08, 2020, 09:02:46 PM »
Danny,

Oops! I should have just said at or near the leg joint. Good catch. (Actually I was waiting to see if Doc Henderson caught that anatomy faux pas. :D). I should know a bulldog would know all about chewing up a chunk of meat and what to expect. :D :D

Often we will put the 2 small lower joints off the front legs in one pack as one small roast or put one in with the blade area which is a bigger cut of meat. I hate boning out shoulders and worse so the neck but they make a nice roast and once cooked the meat peels right off with a fork.

BTW - I also will soak any bloodshot sections in ice/water for a day or so to help remove the blood. You still lose some but can save a lot usually.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline RPF2509

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2020, 07:02:05 PM »
I always hang my deer from 4 -9 days.  Skin first as soon as I get it home from a field gutting.  Cut away all bloodshot meat and extra if you have to. Hang it hind legs up and bag it with a sock.  If its warm I'll put a fan on it during the day.  Squeeze the hams when you first hang it and notice how hard they are.  Check it every day for mold and squeeze the hams. Wipe off any mold with white vinegar and a paper towel.  When the hams get soft after 3 to 5 days start butchering.  Shoulders first then backstrap and then separate the hindquarters. Depending how I feel and how fast its curing I'll take up to 4 days to process the deer.  Its always at night to avoid flies.  Stringing it out keeps me from getting tired and wasting meat.  I do not have a grinder so all the fat/ silverskin is trimmed, small bits goes to stew or jerkey.  If the deer is big enough, I'll do ribs - always fresh the day its killed.  Tenderloins too are cut out fresh and marinated for a few days.  All 'rind', the tough layer that forms on the outside as it cures, is removed with a broadblade kitchen knife in more of a scraping motion (knife is held perpendicular to the length of meat and scraped with micro cuts) than a cutting motion.  You know your meat is cured enough if the rind comes off easy.  I've never had a bad tasting deer or a tough one either.

Offline Walnut Beast

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1061
  • Location: NE
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #30 on: November 10, 2020, 07:54:11 PM »
Sounds like some good stuff. But I definitely wouldnít take the hide off. Especially if it gets really cool or cold then warms up some. If itís warm and doesnít really cool off I would get the hide off.  Gets to be more work when everything dries out. A deer can hang a long time in the shade even if the temps warm up some. With you doing everything your doing you definitely need a grinder. You would love it 👍

Offline Walnut Beast

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1061
  • Location: NE
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2020, 08:02:43 PM »
If your worried or have a problem about hair on the carcass after skinning. Get the propane torch out and do a quick singe over it

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8857
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #32 on: November 10, 2020, 09:11:33 PM »
   Sorry guys. You do what you like but I will continue to try as hard as I can to skin my deer while they are still warm and "hang" them only enough to chill the meat and as I mentioned before I may chill it after it is deboned with me pulling the various cuts off the carcass on the skinning rack as I described above.

    I would be very nervous about eating meat that has hung 4-9 days or more especially when it was not kept below 40 degrees F the whole time it was on the rack. I hear people talk about aging to tenderize the meat but I figure that is what cubing and slow cooking roasts and such is for. It works fine for us. 
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Trackerbuddy

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2020, 08:06:56 AM »
I disagree about the fat.  I hunt up north and the deer fatten up in acorns and field corn.  Slice off a piece of fast and fry it.  If it tastes good your good too go.  Fat doesn't keep as long as the meat.  
Now if you hunt in Texas and that deer has been eating sage brush and dessert grass that's a different story

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8857
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #34 on: November 11, 2020, 08:24:08 AM »
   The first (and last if I remember correctly) time I ate deer fat was on some ribs on the grill. The experience was very much like eating a green persimmon for those of you who have tried that,
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline RPF2509

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2020, 11:33:01 AM »
Fat taste is so variable.  I've had corn fed deer fat and its OK.  Woods deer fat, I'll pass.  I left the skin on once and it took me longer to skin the thing than I though possible, slow and lots of effort.  I'll keep on skinning fresh.  I've cured deer many times when daytime temps were in the 80's and nights in the 40s.  Warm temps accelerate the cure and cool temps prolong it, that's why I squeeze the hams every day to get a feel for how the cure is progressing.  Some people bag their deer during the day in a sleeping bag to keep it cool - I never have; the fan helps a lot during warm weather.  My meat always feels cool when butchering, even after a warm day.  Some say leaving the skin on lets the fat flavor permeate the meat but the one time I did this it did not seem to affect the flavor - this was before I butchered it myself so maybe the butcher knew what he was doing.

A skinning technique I've heard about but never tried is hang the deer by the head from a sturdy beam (or tie it to a vehicle) skin enough off  the neck to get a fist sized rock underneath, tie a rope or chain around the rock outside the skin and use a vehicle to pull the skin off.  I'm told it works as quick as pulling off a sock.

Offline Texas Ranger

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 7274
  • Age: 79
  • Location: Livingston, Texas, God's Country
  • Gender: Male
  • Texan, by God and by choice.
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #36 on: November 11, 2020, 12:22:47 PM »



A skinning technique I've heard about but never tried is hang the deer by the head from a sturdy beam (or tie it to a vehicle) skin enough off  the neck to get a fist sized rock underneath, tie a rope or chain around the rock outside the skin and use a vehicle to pull the skin off.  I'm told it works as quick as pulling off a sock.
Works with a  tree limb and ATV.  Helps to cut the hide down  the legs, cut lower legs off, use the stone and pull
The Ranger, home of Texas Forestry

Offline SawyerTed

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1632
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Germanton, NC
  • Gender: Male
  • Summey Lumber Services, LLC
    • Share Post
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #37 on: November 11, 2020, 01:07:58 PM »
Iím with Howard, yíall do as you prefer.  For me, I skin as soon as possible after harvest and the quarters and back straps go in a cooler immediately.  If I processed my venison at home, Iíd still skin first thing.  My goal is to get the meat on ice ASAP.  This afternoon it is 74 degrees, if I harvest a deer, I donít want it Hanging very long at that temperature before going on ice.
Woodmizer LT35HD25, WM BMS 250, WM BMT 250, Kubota MX5100, IH McCormick Farmall 140, Husqvarna 372XP, Husqvarna 455 Rancher, Ram 3500 6.7 Cummins

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8857
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #38 on: November 11, 2020, 04:37:15 PM »
  "Cure"? No thanks. I am a predator not a scavenger. (Sorry - the devil made me say that. :()
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline BradMarks

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 790
  • Location: Oregon
  • Gender: Male
  • Foresters are TREE-mendous
    • Share Post
    • Pacforest Supply
Re: Deer meat processing
« Reply #39 on: November 11, 2020, 06:20:41 PM »
No matter what the method, nobody is complaining about a "bad deer". Pretty hard to screw it up.  I will gut it in the field, hang it from the back legs, cut the head off and skin it as soon as I get back to camp. I use white vinegar and water to clean any blood stains. All meat with blood(kill area) is discarded. If there are no flies or bees (needs to be cold for that), I will let it air dry for a few hrs before putting a bag over it.  It will hang at camp or home for 5 days(combined) before I butcher it. I will give the body cavity the "smell test" every day and pull away the deer bag as it sticks to the carcass. I do remove the heavy silverskin when processing the backstrap, just for making every bite tender. We don't do roasts, mostly steaks and stew meat, with the rest ground for burger. The lighter "silver" stays on. Never had a taste problem whatsoever. Vacuum seal these days, it used to be double wrapped.  Real old timers talk about waiting for it to mold, scrape it off, and a butchering they will go.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Tried something new processing my deer

Started by WV Sawmiller on The Outdoor Board

4 Replies
377 Views
Last post October 23, 2020, 08:30:39 AM
by mike_belben
xx
Deer Meat

Started by Kansas on FOOD! FOOD! FOOD!

37 Replies
6524 Views
Last post February 12, 2011, 04:02:19 PM
by ErikC
xx
Meat Grinders for deer

Started by rbhunter on The Outdoor Board

6 Replies
1766 Views
Last post December 02, 2007, 09:00:14 PM
by Sunfield Hardwood
cheesy
Preparing Deer meat

Started by woodbowl on General Board

46 Replies
11698 Views
Last post October 07, 2005, 09:38:52 AM
by OneWithWood
 


Powered by EzPortal