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Author Topic: Drop Starting  (Read 9435 times)

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Offline timberbeast

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Drop Starting
« on: December 22, 2001, 05:49:41 PM »
Is it just me?  Come clean,  guys.  Every safety manual says to never drop start a saw,  but,  even though I only wear size tens,  I've never had a saw where I could fit my boot in the handle to start it the "safe" way.  How else are you going to start it?  I drop start every time.  Maybe if I had bare feet........
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline Jeff

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2001, 06:17:07 PM »
Always, and I know its not by the book too. Almost everyone I know does it too. The only saws that I have not drop started are ones with compression releases that makes them easy to hold on the ground.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Ezekiel 22:30

Offline allyson

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2001, 07:49:53 PM »
Same here. I always drop start and everyone I know does. It seems to be the only efficient way for me.

Happy Holidays,
Billy

Offline Don P

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2001, 09:17:55 PM »
shhh... :D, But I do know 2 people who do it the right way.
A laborer works with his hands
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Offline woodmills1

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2001, 04:36:57 AM »
drop start every time unless it happens to flood, then on the ground with the trigger wide open.  could really use an extra hand for that method. :D
James Mills,Lovely wife,collect old tools,vacuuming fool,36 bdft/hr,oak paper cutter,ebonic yooper rapper nauga seller, Blue Ox? its not fast, 2 cat family, LT70,edger, 375 bd ft/hr, we like Bob,free heat,no oil 12 years,big splitter, baked stuffed lobster, still cuttin the logs dere IAM

Offline Jeff

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2001, 05:13:17 AM »
ya know, it would really be interesting to see the statistics that caused someone to say that putting the saw on the ground is the safest method. Could it be that that statistically that starting by the foot on the saw on the ground method is so much safer because if nobody does it, nobody gets hurt?

Its clear to me that if 99 guys out of a 100 drop start, statistically more of them will get hurt thus making it a more dangerous form of starting the saw.

BTW, my method is more of a throw the saw away from me then drop.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Ezekiel 22:30

Offline Tom

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2001, 08:44:13 AM »
I drop start, but I don't have hold of the operating handle when I do it.  I hold the oval front handle at the top with my right hand and hold the pull cord handle with my left.  Then I drop the saw straight down, in effect giving the rope a short pull.  My Husky will take 2-4 pulls with the choke on when cold to pop then run when the choke is taken off and the rope pulled once again.  No locked on throttle.

I think that is where the most safety is.  Fire the saw up in idle and the chain doesn't run.

:D :D If I were to put my foot through the operating handle with the saw on the ground then pulling the rope would become a two man operation.  I don't think I could reach it. :D :D
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Offline DanG

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2001, 11:08:13 AM »
I tried to do it "right" the first couple of times I started my new Echo, but, by the time I got it started, I was too tired to use it.  Drop starting works better, and doesn't seem dangerous unless you're in thick underbrush. In that case, I start it while kneeling, and hold it down by the front bar with my left hand. In most of our woods down here, there is a lot of brush and vines, making it tough going, at times.
"I don't feel like an old man.  I feel like a young man who has something wrong with him."  Dick Cavett
"Beat not thy sword into a plowshare, rather beat the sword of thine enemy into a plowshare."

Offline Gordon

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2001, 12:39:06 PM »
Well as much as I would like to answer this thread I can't. Just in case my insurance man reads this board. :-[ :-X

Thats all I'm going to say on the subject. Guess it relates to stuff the turkey with dressing or not when you cook it. I stuff the turkey, I'm still alive. So take it with a grain of salt. :)

Gordon

Offline Corley5

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2001, 03:17:08 PM »
I've also always "drop started" chainsaws by holding the front handle with my left hand and pulling the rope with my right.  To me it's the only way.  A bad thing I've been know to do with a stubborn saw is to hold the trigger with my right and pull the rope with my left.  When it starts I grab the front handle and away I go.  It works, I know it's not the way to do it and I don't make a habit of it.  I always make sure I'm in wide open spaces and can let go if something happens.  Don't try this at home :D
Burnt Gunpowder is the Smell Of Freedom

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2001, 03:41:20 PM »
   Til I got my Husky 51, my experience was limited to saws where no matter WHAT met ::)hod, you'd be so tuckered out by the time it consented to start, you'd be toast. The Husky was the first where I read and was taught to try the 'safe method. It starts well either way. The first start I will frequently do on the ground, cuz of the safety issue. But once it's warmed up and I'm pretty sure it'll only be one pull on the fly- I do like the drop start.

   It reminds me of the way you can draw back a compound bow where you start with it pointed up at about a 45* angle, left arm out straight, right hand close to the left- and then as you bring it down to the horizontal you are pulling your hands apart at the same time and drawing the bowstring back. I don't know WHY it works- but I can get that little bit of extra pull that way that lets me use a heavier weight bow. Dropstarting the saw does the same thing. I think it somehow recruits more upper body strength. Does that make any sense?  ::)   lw
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline Kevin

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2001, 03:49:58 PM »
Another method is to place the rear handle between your legs and hold the handle bar with one hand and pull the starter cord with your other hand.

Offline timberbeast

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2001, 05:19:36 PM »
Kevin,  how long after it starts do you keep the rear handle betw....um.....never mind.   :D  Often,  after I drop a tree,  I'll hold the saw (chain not touching anything) against the trunk by the front handle and kinda put my knee up on the rear handle.  Hey,  here's a business opportunity for the creative!!  Build a cheap jig that slips over the bottom of the rear handle with a small platform to put your foot on to hold the saw down!  Could be called the ForestryForum Safe-T jig! :D :D
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline Jeff

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2001, 05:58:56 PM »
How about a recessed stand plate. Something substantial that slides out of the saw body to stand on to start it,  then slides back in and latches when not in use.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Ezekiel 22:30

Offline woodmills1

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2001, 07:48:16 PM »
I know you said drop start but isn't it really throw start? 8)
James Mills,Lovely wife,collect old tools,vacuuming fool,36 bdft/hr,oak paper cutter,ebonic yooper rapper nauga seller, Blue Ox? its not fast, 2 cat family, LT70,edger, 375 bd ft/hr, we like Bob,free heat,no oil 12 years,big splitter, baked stuffed lobster, still cuttin the logs dere IAM

Offline DanG

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2001, 09:57:46 PM »
Jig, Schmigg! How 'bout ELECTRIC START? 8)
"I don't feel like an old man.  I feel like a young man who has something wrong with him."  Dick Cavett
"Beat not thy sword into a plowshare, rather beat the sword of thine enemy into a plowshare."

Offline allyson

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #16 on: December 23, 2001, 10:17:14 PM »
I sure would like an ELECTRIC start!

Happy Holidays,
Billy

Offline timberbeast

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2001, 01:03:14 AM »
Never thought of that!!!  How much could that cost??  I suppose the starter would be purty heavy,  though,  but it could be like an accessory with a spline that fits into the saw and a trigger.  Hmmmmm..........
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #18 on: December 25, 2001, 12:06:55 PM »

Quote

I know you said drop start but isn't it really throw start? 8)


  No, no, you throw it after you decide no way it's ever gonna start :D   lw
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline Kevin

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2001, 12:12:15 PM »
Wake, that`s a drop kick!

Offline Frank_Pender

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #20 on: December 25, 2001, 05:40:24 PM »
Kevin, I am with you.  that is the way I have done it for 40 plus years.  I still have all of my appendigages, inclusding my ears and nose.  The hold-down unit could be place on the bottom of the saw with two sturdy slide units on the sides for the plate to in and out.  One could have a lever to simple twist  :P ::)in one direction or the other to hold the plate in place.  My biggest concern would then be the amount of weight that would be added to the saw.  I will work on the idea.  I have some pretty talanted x-students that are mechanical enginerrrrs.  We will see what we can do. :P ::) ::) ;)
Frank Pender

Offline Kevin

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #21 on: December 25, 2001, 06:42:05 PM »
Frank, just put a kick starter on it.

Easy Sawyer

Offline Corley5

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #22 on: December 25, 2001, 08:41:03 PM »
3120 Huskys would especially benefit from a kick or electric starter.  Hard to start even with decompression and it may even make them start harder.  Don't own one wouldn't want one of the monsters.  Wheels would be neccessary so it could be ridden tree to tree.  They will cut 8)
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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #23 on: December 26, 2001, 09:22:11 AM »
When you "drop start" is the chain brake engaged?

I agree on the need for a hold down plate for your foot on the back handle at least until they make a handle that will fit a safety toed winter boot.

The "crotch-clamp" technique mentioned by Kevin is preferred. Secure the back handle of the saw between your legs while holding the top handle firmly. That's sometimes confused with a "drop start", but you have control of the saw .

Chain brake should be engaged though.

~Ron

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #24 on: December 26, 2001, 07:06:55 PM »
   The infamous Jonsered ancient sawbeast that I never could start had a (nonfunctional) compression release feature kinda like what Bombardier snowmobiles do. Do you have those on your bigger saws?          lw
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline timberbeast

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2001, 12:32:32 AM »
I can drop start with the chain brake engaged on my Stihls.  They do seem to start harder that way,  although that may be perception rather than fact.
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline Kevin

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #26 on: December 27, 2001, 04:08:35 AM »
Wake, my 92cc Stihl has the decomp, it starts well.

Offline Gordon

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2001, 06:53:39 AM »
My husky has decomp as well and you sure can tell the difference if you use it or not. On a cold start I'll use it. Warm start usually one pull so I don't always use it.

Gordon

Offline RSteiner

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #28 on: January 09, 2002, 09:38:51 AM »
I am new to this forum but not new to chain saws I never drop start my saws, even the big Sachs Dolmar.  Many years ago I attended two seminars put on by Soren Erickson he introduced me to one of the methods mentioned in this thread, placing the rear handle under one leg just above your knee.  I find I get good leverage and a straight pull on the starter rope.  

Using this method I have never pulled the starter rope out too far.  If the saw doesn't before you get tired take a break and fix the saw.

Randy
Randy

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2002, 06:47:34 AM »
   I TOTALLY agree on that last point. Yanking your arm off without good results is a hint that it's time to investigate WHY it won't start. Mine is currently a) cold and b) has real old gas in it- so guess what? I know even if I bring it in to warm it up, the results will be nil until I at least give it good gas and most likely pull the plug and clean it. :(   lw
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline fencerowphil (Phil L.)

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #30 on: January 20, 2002, 06:35:49 PM »
Hey guys!
Drop start my small saws?  yeah.
When I put the 42" bar on my new Stihl 090 yesterday, to get ready to break it in on some small stuff tomorrow,  ... well,
let's just say, I don't think I will be drop starting this baby!
First, I better do some butter flies with dumbells or I'll tear a rotator cuff or something.  This thing weighs 35 lbs. and it almost, but not quite, tips over on its nose on its own bar weight.
I don't know whether I'll break in the saw or it will be the other way around.
Phil L.
Bi-VacAtional:  Piano tuner and sawyer.  (Use one to take a vacation from the other.) Have two Stihl 090s, one Stihl 075, Echo CS8000, Echo 346,  two Homely-ite 27AVs, Peterson 10" Swingblade Winch Production Frame, 36" and 54"Alaskan mills, and a sore back.

Offline Tom

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2002, 06:42:49 PM »
hmm sounds like just the ticket to do some chainsaw carving.  You'll be far enough back that the chips won't hit you and you won't get dirty. :D
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Offline Gordon

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #32 on: January 21, 2002, 04:58:19 AM »
Phil, all joking aside be CAREFUL,,, a saw can get away from ya pretty darn quick if your not careful. Better to take it slow and have the same amount of fingers and toes at the end of the day. Also a heavy saw among other things will wear you down pretty quick just hossing it around.

Once your out in the woods for a few hours and start to get wore down, your judgement will also suffer. Keep that in mind as well. That is when injuries happen.

I know it goes without saying but chaps and a helmet are a great investment. DON'T leave the truck without them. After all they don't give you much protection on the truck seat.

Have fun with it ---take it slow till ya get the hang of it. My Husky's weigh half of what your saw weighs and it sure wears me out before it wears out. ;)

Gordon

Offline fencerowphil (Phil L.)

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Re: Drop Starting
« Reply #33 on: January 21, 2002, 05:36:07 PM »
Gordon,
Thanks for the words of wisdom regarding the big 090.

As you can imagine, I bought it to mill with.   Before I use the Alaskan mill on some pine yellow pine I have,  I plan to do some very careful cross cutting - just to break in the motor a little.   This big machine and I will get along much better with it in that frame.
Phil L.
Bi-VacAtional:  Piano tuner and sawyer.  (Use one to take a vacation from the other.) Have two Stihl 090s, one Stihl 075, Echo CS8000, Echo 346,  two Homely-ite 27AVs, Peterson 10" Swingblade Winch Production Frame, 36" and 54"Alaskan mills, and a sore back.


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