The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service





Author Topic: What kind of kiln is needed for drying cut barn timbers?  (Read 5996 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Schramm

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 161
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Spring Valley Illinois
  • Gender: Male
  • Timeless Reflections
    • Share Post
    • Antique Mirror Glass Co
Re: What kind of kiln is needed for drying cut barn timbers?
« Reply #20 on: December 27, 2012, 02:27:57 PM »
Stephen,

How is the weather in Canada?

Rob

Offline Stephen1

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2013
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Kilworthy ON> Canada
  • Gender: Male
  • Where there is a will, there is a way!
    • Share Post
    • muskoka Sawmill
Re: What kind of kiln is needed for drying cut barn timbers?
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2012, 03:58:47 PM »
Hey Rob, I am on a train from Toronto to Quebec City to see my new Granddaughter. It is dumping snow. I left Toronto at 0640 and it had quite snowing. We caught this storm around Kingston and the drifts are so big, we are plowing big time, keeps knocking out the engine, with so much snow in the rads, and the compressor room on the engine. So far we are only about 2 hours later but I'm glad I'm not driving my car. It is nice to have a beer and a nap while some else drives.
cheers,
Stephen
IDRY Vacum Kiln, LT40HDWide, BMS250 sharpener/setter 742b Bobcat, TCM forklift, Sthil 026,038, 461. 1952 TEA Fergusan Tractor

Offline Jay C. White Cloud

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Thetford, Vermont, USA
  • Gender: Male
  • semper fidelis
    • Share Post
    • Online business card
Re: What kind of kiln is needed for drying cut barn timbers?
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2012, 04:25:50 PM »
Quote
Today I had a guy call me and offer me BEAUTIFUL WHITE ASH and RUSTIC OAK already ready and at 9% 1" thick at get this $.45 per board foot!  He bought out a MILL and has well over 10K BF of oak and 20K BF of Ash.  I asked him for a price for everything as I do not think that I can pass it up!  What do you think?

Hey Rob,

That is a great price even if you had a 50% cull out!!! You will be able to do some beautiful work with it I'm sure.  Scott's advice on a good moisture meter for your kind of work is probably a good idea.  9% moisture could do some "funky," things if it goes into a restaurant or home with a healthy humidity level.  This could be too dry and need to acclimate to your shop after rough sizing.  Folks often worry more about getting their wood really dry and what they should go for is "homeostasis," in their wood to the project living environment the wood will be in.

We as a culture have become too, indoctrinated into "homogeneity;" loosing touch with the way things had been done for millenia.  For the first five years of my wood crafting life, I never used a tape measure, joinery was Incorporated to accommodate wood movement, and the stock I worked in was almost all less than 6 mouths out of a tree.  This included cabinet doors, chairs, table, and the like.  All made with "green" wood.  My Sister In Law brought a small corner table from New Mexico a few years ago done locally in the "Mission Style," with reclaimed wood. It was a beautiful little piece of work, till it started to split and blow apart from expansion.  It just couldn't take the East cost humidity in May, June.  It was salvageable but it show that things can definitely be too dry.

The Rotex Sanders by the way, I forgot to tell you about, have two major flaws, one they must have a vacuum attached to them and they cause a lot of fights over who get to use it. ;D I would also highly recommend an eraser stick for your sanding pads. They will last 10 to 20 time longer.  I keep a can of silicone spray on hand and lightly spray the pad between erasing off the dust. Don't use too much it can effect your glue up or finishing, but for sanding it makes a huge difference.

Regards,

Jay
"To posses an open mind, is to hold a key to many doors, and the ability to created doors where there were none before."

"When it is all said and done, they will have said they did it themselves."-teams response under a good leader.

Offline Schramm

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 161
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Spring Valley Illinois
  • Gender: Male
  • Timeless Reflections
    • Share Post
    • Antique Mirror Glass Co
Re: What kind of kiln is needed for drying cut barn timbers?
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2012, 07:47:10 PM »
I always acclimate wood prior to working with it unless I just pick it up from a home center.  The problem with my shop is to keep cost down I turn the heat down when I leave and up when I come and I am not at the wood shop everyday.

I think most of the reclaimed lumber is 12-15% moisture content is that really going to matter if I mill/plane/rip it down to size and stack it in my building and let it accimate to the building until I use it?  Are you trying to say that I need to do something special to the wood if I am going to sell a sealed mirror frame to a restaurant in NYC or are you talking about wainscot and flooring?  I am really confused! ???

Here is my issue:  I have used reclaimed lumber before for many different projects and I have never worried about anything I guess because I did not know better.  Maybe it is just dumb luck or  maybe leaving it at the MC that it had and acclimating the pieces after doing the cut list for the frames.  Originally from the time I was 20 years old to present I have been a decorative painter and that is actually how I got started in mirrors.  Then if I wanted old wood, I painted whatever it was and just did multiple glaze layers until I got what I wanted.  Most of my work was patina work in metals that is how I did mirrors.  But with paint and I can make anything look like it is something that it is not, you can hold it in your hand and look at it close and you could never tell.  Been doing it for 27 years.

Here are some pics of some wood work that I did to look like antique mahogany.
 

  

  

  

  

 

Offline Jay C. White Cloud

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Thetford, Vermont, USA
  • Gender: Male
  • semper fidelis
    • Share Post
    • Online business card
Re: What kind of kiln is needed for drying cut barn timbers?
« Reply #24 on: December 27, 2012, 10:03:24 PM »
Quote
I think most of the reclaimed lumber is 12-15% moisture content is that really going to matter if I mill/plane/rip it down to size and stack it in my building and let it acclimate to the building until I use it?  Are you trying to say that I need to do something special to the wood if I am going to sell a sealed mirror frame to a restaurant in NYC or are you talking about wainscot and flooring?  I am really confused!

Hey Rob,

My Mother did faux wood and marble work, yours is the first that I have seen that is as good or better than her's.  :o  Now that is craftsman ship!  I don't like faux work at all, matter of fact, I really don't like it, and steer clients away from ever doing it.  I will not any longer, I'll send them to you.  My dislike for current faux work, is I knew of no one in the trade that would give a client what my mother could do. I can see you can, this is beyond artisan work, you really should teach or take on an apprentice if you haven't.

Put your mind at ease about the wood. One of the challenges of writing on a public forum is what you are writing you must be aware of more than one reader, so I write as if I'm speaking to a class or audience with different levels and skill sets.  Actually, your last entry has really done a good service to this conversation.  You have more than demonstrated that your skill is way beyond that of a hobbyist or general craftsman.
Quote
I will let you know that I am very new to this but a very fast learner.  I am in the process of buying a Woodland Mills HM126 which I am hoping is the right choice for cutting down barn timbers into flooring.
This statement was one of humility, and speaks to your nature, but did not truly reflect what level you are at.
Quote
Here is my issue:  I have used reclaimed lumber before for many different projects and I have never worried about anything I guess because I did not know better.  Maybe it is just dumb luck or  maybe leaving it at the MC that it had and acclimating the pieces after doing the cut list for the frames.
It isn't "dumb luck," at all, it's what many artisans of your level know by just touching the material they are working in, be it stone, wood, plaster, or whatever.  Through the process of crafting it, watching it, listening to it; the material will teach you 90% of what you need to know, if you really listen to it well. 

Wood dryness has become such a "talking point," and "focus," in wood working, that it borderlines on obsessive/compulsive.  I don't own a moisture meter, the one recommend sounds like one I would buy if I was doing your kind of work, but more out of curiosity than guidance for use of material.  My apprentice did a big slab table this year out of a giant 4.8 m (16') Elm bolt.  The wood had only been out of the log for maybe two months.  It is spalted in spots, and while he was crafting the piece, a tiny mushroom grew out of one of the checks that had not received a "butterfly" patch yet.  That means the moisture content was probably, (I'm judging by experience,) about 20% to 25%, well above the norm for what most woodworkers would ever consider using.  That means the wood's inner portions had a moisture content high enough to allow the "incipient decay" of the spalt fungus to continue to grow.  The table is coming along nicely, and when I get some photos, I will start a post thread on working in "green," wood, watch for it.  Trust your instincts, keep doing what you are doing, and if you have any questions or just want a second opinion, check back in.  You can use my personal email as well the info is on my profile here at FF.

Regards,

Jay
"To posses an open mind, is to hold a key to many doors, and the ability to created doors where there were none before."

"When it is all said and done, they will have said they did it themselves."-teams response under a good leader.

Offline Schramm

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 161
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Spring Valley Illinois
  • Gender: Male
  • Timeless Reflections
    • Share Post
    • Antique Mirror Glass Co
Re: What kind of kiln is needed for drying cut barn timbers?
« Reply #25 on: December 28, 2012, 01:19:08 AM »
When I was young (12 years old) I started working for my grandfather who was a plasterer and mason.  As a younger guy I just really wanted to have fun but always listened to what he said.  Most of his conversation with me was no matter what you do, take your time and do it well.  No one will care how long it takes if the end product was excellent.  I have always taken what he told me to heart though I think he never thought I listened.  Though at that time all I did was move plaster to stations I was only taught the entry level of plaster.  Funny thing is my first business was a plasterer but not a traditional plasterer, I did Venetian plaster.  This was before all that rag rolling crap of the '90's and I met with and learned faux from masters of there trade (old timers) and they all had the same thing to say that my grandfather did!  Over the years of both faux and mirror manufacturing I have had a lot of companies come in and try to take over everything doing the art in a way I do not agree with but now most of them are gone.  Most of my Facebook friends are designers, architects, builders and glass guys who really love what they do and treat it as art and not a dollar.  I wont lie I love making money but the truth be known I love my job, I like waking up and doing it and I am lucky to be able to make a living at it.  Nothing in life is easy but if you do not love what you do, your bound to fail.
I like to test ideas, in fact everytime I come up with a new idea my wife sinks in her seat and cringes at the thought of how much this is going to cost.  I am the one that loves everything old, she likes it new or newish so when I make things for the house I make them old with a new twist and we are both happy.  This idea of buying all these tools may be the craziest thing that I have ever done as to be honest I love to work with wood but I have to GOOGLE a lot of things.  I have gotten a lot better over the last 10 years and with the help of festool and Kreg have become pretty good at it and now I get to take this whole thing to the next level.  Trust me when I say, that everyones words of wisdom will not go on deaf ears, I take all things to heart and try them out.  In fact today I did shiplap for the first time and love it, makes for a beautiful and simple installation much better then tounge & groove for wall installs!
Thanks again!
Rob

By the way, I am not a huge faux fan either.  I do furniture and have been training my daughter to do it, I will post some pics of a Titanic Desk that she did out of a $6 garage sale find.  Its quite cool!!!


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Kiln Drying timbers

Started by Old Wood Whacker on Timber Framing/Log construction

6 Replies
365 Views
Last post May 18, 2020, 09:46:38 AM
by tule peak timber
xx
Hot deal on white pine-what kind of drying needed

Started by flip on Drying and Processing

11 Replies
2041 Views
Last post December 10, 2005, 03:54:45 PM
by Gunny
xx
Specialty drying/vacuum kiln needed

Started by bkaimwood on Drying and Processing

0 Replies
496 Views
Last post June 11, 2016, 03:22:02 PM
by bkaimwood
wireless
Re-using Barn Timbers

Started by ballen on Timber Framing/Log construction

39 Replies
10500 Views
Last post January 23, 2011, 11:48:40 AM
by Jim_Rogers
 


Powered by EzPortal