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Author Topic: Eastern Colorado  (Read 3865 times)

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Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Eastern Colorado
« Reply #60 on: April 30, 2013, 07:49:20 PM »
There are several types of wheat: hard wheats, used mostly for breads, soft wheats, used for general baking and pastries, and durum wheat, used to produce pastas. There are some others, but they are not generally grown in the US.

The hard and soft wheats come in both winter and spring forms, the only difference being the time of planting. Winter wheats are planted in the fall and spring wheats in the spring. Winter wheats are generally higher yielding, but subject to frost heaving and winter kill in severe climates. As you move north in the wheat growing areas, you find more spring wheats.

Ohio and Kansas both are in the primary winter wheat area, but if memory serves, Ohio has mostly soft red winter wheat, and Kansas has more hard winter wheat.

Hope that is of some help. Wheat is cool. ;D
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Online Al_Smith

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Re: Eastern Colorado
« Reply #61 on: April 30, 2013, 08:54:56 PM »
Well there I learned something as I was always under the impression that hard wheat was spring wheat .

Not to get off on too much of a tangent of discussing water but what then would be harvested in late August as far as  wheat ?

Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Eastern Colorado
« Reply #62 on: April 30, 2013, 09:57:10 PM »
I looked up Kansas, Nebraska on the production maps. looks like all hard red winter wheat area. It may be the hard wheats get ripe later in the season. Wheat in Ohio is usually June as I remember.
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline sandhills

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Re: Eastern Colorado
« Reply #63 on: May 01, 2013, 10:36:29 AM »
Around my area (basically central Nebraska) a lot of guys have planted winter wheat and then followed it up with soybeans.  They most generally are harvesting the wheat around the end of June to first part of July, pretty risky sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't.

Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Eastern Colorado
« Reply #64 on: May 01, 2013, 11:19:42 AM »
My dad used to do that in Missouri. Seemed like about half the time it did ok. Maybe once in 5 or 6 years the rains would come just right and he would get almost as much as with the early beans. Double crop is good. ;D
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline Kansas

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Re: Eastern Colorado
« Reply #65 on: May 01, 2013, 03:41:53 PM »
Back in the grain elevator days, the question for us would be, would wheat harvest be wrapped up by the 4th of July so we would have it off? Some years yes, some no. Now there is very little wheat grown in NE Kansas. Back in the day, the old timers around the local farmers Co-op said farmers came to town twice a year to pay their bill. Once at wheat harvest, once at fall harvest. I guess a lot of the farmers used the Co-op as a kind of bank. They would just deposit their grain checks at the Co-op, take what they needed for supplies, and leave what was left, over and beyond their bill.

Had to go to school to learn how to distinguish the difference between hard and soft winter wheat. They had this grand idea to keep them apart in the grain bins. I never could really tell the difference. I can tell you now, it all got put into the same bins. A load of hard wheat going out? You pulled a lever. You wanted soft wheat? Pull the same lever.


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