The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts





Author Topic: Strawbale? Good or bad???  (Read 1628 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline nightfury

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 30
  • Location: Stonewall, Oklahoma
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Strawbale? Good or bad???
« on: July 31, 2013, 07:20:03 PM »
I am sure this has been discussed on the forum before, but is strawbale a good option to use for infill?

Offline Satamax

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1437
  • Location: South eastern alps, in France but right on the italian border.
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 10:25:05 PM »


Well, i'm looking into this for myself.   I wouldn't say infill. The straw needs to breathe. They seem to say that you can put osb, plasterboard etc, with a vapor barier on the inside. You need a vapor barier there. But on the outside, you have to have a vapor permeable film. or protection.

Usual finishes are lime based renders. Earth based like cob, a mix of the two, or wood panneling with a  film which lets the vapor out. And the last layer on the ground is often  done with air entrained entrained concrete blocks (Ytong over here) for moisture seepage protection and mice protection. As well, they often use a sort of metallic mesh on the bottom of wood panneling, so mices don't go living in it.  Few information at permies.com for example. And if you can read french, i can show you a few sites where  there's a good wealth of informations. The straw bale on it's edge insulates better than laid flat. And in this case is good for "passive" house. Tho, it's not quite good enough for roofing. But but in a roof, 16" of wood wool will do for passive.

Hth.

Max.
French CD4 sawmill. Latil TL 73. Self moving hydraulic crane. Iveco daily 4x4 lwb dead as of 06/2020. Replaced by a Brimont TL80 CSA.

Offline irishcountry

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 32
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2013, 03:52:29 PM »
Seems like a no brainer when it comes to insulation and energy efficiency .  Not sure how helpful this is but here is a article from a nearby area in Michigan .  I'm sure there's more on this guy on the internet as well .  We can have some wet times of year here so wonder if their are any cement based products for the exterior  that "breathe" like shotcrete ect.  Heres the link --http://www.mlive.com/living/jackson/index.ssf/2011/01/post_5.html

Offline Hilltop366

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2817
  • Location: Nova Scotia
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2013, 04:07:00 PM »
Can't find the original article I was reading a while back but I think it was related to this http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/publications/en/rh-pr/tech/00-103-E.htm look around the CMHC web site for more.  Where you are located and building design & materials seem to be the main factors of success or fail.

Offline SPIKER

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2101
  • Age: 2016
  • Location: Ohio, Ashland County
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2013, 09:45:54 AM »
I believe it was Mother Earth News mag that had some good information on them back err maybe 10yrs ago.   Other than that I can't help much over Google...

Mark
I'm looking for help all the shrinks have given up on me :o

Offline mesquite buckeye

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6103
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Tucson, AZ
  • Gender: Male
  • Trees are good- even ones with stickers
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2013, 11:29:05 AM »
Great insulation, but I worry about termites. They love straw. ;D
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline shinnlinger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2058
  • Location: Canaan NH
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2013, 10:04:57 PM »
I was involved with two in Oregon and was going to insulate my current house with bales but got a real good deal on poly iso out of a lumber kiln so went that route instead.  There are a lot in the southwest and a lot in quebec with a fair amount everywhere else.  You would be surprised

THe key question I have for you is where are you getting your bales?  If you have to have them custom baled and trucked in from 2000 miles away it may offset any good juju you hoped to capture.  It will also cost you a pretty penny as diesel is key for everything I just typed.

Dave
Shinnlinger
Woodshop teacher, pasture raised chicken farmer
34 horse kubota L-2850, Turner Band Mill, '84 F-600,
living in self-built/milled timberframe home

Offline shinnlinger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2058
  • Location: Canaan NH
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2013, 10:17:52 PM »
You encase the bales in a natural plaster where it is pretty impervious to any bugs or anything like that. 

Dave
Shinnlinger
Woodshop teacher, pasture raised chicken farmer
34 horse kubota L-2850, Turner Band Mill, '84 F-600,
living in self-built/milled timberframe home

Offline scsmith42

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5117
  • Age: 60
  • Location: New Hill, NC
  • Gender: Male
  • He who dies with the most toys... WINS!!!
    • Share Post
    • Whispering Pines Farm
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2013, 11:10:51 PM »
I looked into using strawbale insulation in my new shop, and it was actually more expensive than other options. 
Peterson 10" WPF with 65' of track
Smith - Gallagher dedicated slabber
Tom's 3638D Baker band mill
and a mix of log handling heavy equipment.

Offline shinnlinger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2058
  • Location: Canaan NH
    • Share Post
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2013, 08:44:49 PM »
If you live in an area like Oregon, which banned big burns of fields and farmers have to bale the straw just to get rid of it, it can make sense, but if you have to have it trucked in it probably doesn't.  Another factor is labor.  Smearing plaster is unskilled.  If your building it yourself, and have a bunch of friends, it can be fairly cheap to have a smearfest, but if your paying a contractor it will not be cost effective.  A contractor will probably want to blow concrete on it as well which is a bad idea because then the bales can't breathe.  There is a house near me where the woman had conventional walls built around the bales.  Other than being 20" thick, you wouldn't know it was straw bale, but it certainly wasn't the cheapest way to go.
Shinnlinger
Woodshop teacher, pasture raised chicken farmer
34 horse kubota L-2850, Turner Band Mill, '84 F-600,
living in self-built/milled timberframe home

Offline ziggy

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 39
  • Location: Berea, KY
    • Share Post
    • The Year of Mud
Re: Strawbale? Good or bad???
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2013, 11:07:04 PM »
Straw bales need to breathe from both directions -- no vapor barrier (or non-breathable finish) should exist in any quantity on either face (inside or out). Natural materials, in general, should be capable of "breathing" to transpire moisture naturally throughout the year.

I have written a fair bit about building a timber frame / straw bale house on my website, linked in my profile. Straw bales, like others have mentioned, make sense depending on availability, ability to do the labor yourself or with inexpensive help, etc. There are enough tricks to know about bales to warrant taking a class before attempting anything yourself, and you can end up saving time/$ down the road.

All that said, I think straw bales are a lovely option, and timber frames and straw bales actually make a great combo.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Strawbale infill for a Kiln

Started by Silverback on Drying and Processing

3 Replies
1203 Views
Last post December 08, 2004, 09:25:09 AM
by Silverback
xx
Good Timber Sales, Good Forest Management

Started by Phorester on Forestry and Logging

9 Replies
2116 Views
Last post February 28, 2005, 01:17:50 PM
by Doc
xx
A good hearty soup receipe that warms up the next day good.

Started by luvmexfood on FOOD! FOOD! FOOD!

3 Replies
809 Views
Last post October 19, 2014, 11:32:50 AM
by luvmexfood
xx
good family fun! and soon to be good eatin

Started by sandsawmill14 on General Board

7 Replies
1731 Views
Last post June 15, 2015, 09:20:48 AM
by Magicman
 


Powered by EzPortal