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Author Topic: Are kilns Always necessary?  (Read 2399 times)

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Offline Kelly Palmer

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2013, 02:20:12 PM »
No on the type o....It was the biggest oak in Ola....and have been told it is a black oak.....but it sure is red.  I only have a three foot bar, and don't think it will be hallo enough to reach the center.  Am not sure whether to by an Alaskan with a twelve foot bar?? or to try to get someone with a Lucas?...or lease one? I am thinking about trying to cu to the center with my saw, and see if I hit hallo middle.  Any thoughts?
 

Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2013, 03:24:12 PM »
I'm thinking even a Lucas won't get that done. Why would you want to cut cookies? They are pretty much guaranteed to crack to pieces. I have heard from a guy who cuts cookies at an angle, maybe shifted 20 or 30 degrees from square and the grain offset allows it to dry without cracking. Don't know, you will only get one shot with this one. Good luck. When do we get to see the picture of it? ;D 8) 8)

Is this tree still standing or is it down? If you start probing around on it, you might ruin it. If it is going to have hollow or other rot, that will become apparent at the stump. They used to make extra long crosscut saws for the big western trees. Hate to have to buy a bar/saw for just one job. If it really is 10' in diameter, you can take it down with a 5-6ft saw with no problem cutting from both sides. There is a technique where you might even be able to do it with a 4'. It involves making a cleanout of the center area by reaching in through the face cut.
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline beenthere

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2013, 04:44:16 PM »
Quote
It was the biggest oak in Ola

Where is Ola ??

And is there a chance to get some pics of this big oak?
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline Kelly Palmer

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2013, 05:15:24 PM »
Tamaha....a little town close to Stigler Okla,  about 40 miles west of Ft Smith Ark.   I talked to a man in Ca. that is cutting giant cookies out of some old redwoods, and selling them to museums, or whoever wants them.  They are making timeline marks on them, and they go back 2,600 years.  I'm wanting to do the same on this one, but I don't figure it will be over 500 years old.  Now if my cheese is slipping off of my cracker....do you mind telling me. U can friend me on fb, and see pics...I don't know how to get them on here. 

Offline GAmillworker

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2013, 07:57:06 PM »
 Welcome Kelley Palmer

I found you on face book here is a pic of the big oak tree. 


 

 
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Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2013, 08:08:11 PM »
That is a big ugly. Looks like a bigger problem to tip it over than to cut it. Looks more like 8ft than 10 unless the guy is really tall. Regardless, a big cut. The way that thing sits, I don't think you even need a face cut. just cut halfway on the low side, halfway on the high side. Have a chain pre-hooked to the top and other end loosely to power, 2X or better the height of Mr. Stubby. Pull it over when you cut most of the holding wood. I think a 5 ft bar gets it done no problem.

No sign of rot in the branches I can see. ;D
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline Kelly Palmer

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2013, 09:26:24 PM »
I think that man is pretty tall...and yeah, 8' once you get up a ways, but right at ten down low, and then spreads out again at limbs.  Who has a Lucas that can come up and cut it up?

Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2013, 09:44:44 PM »
If it is really 10ft, you need a bar at least that long and it has to be absolutely perfectly set too. I just don't know if Lucas makes one that big. I'll go look.

Lucas slabbing mill will cut up to 6' 4".

If you want to do this you will need another option.
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline GAmillworker

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #28 on: October 09, 2013, 10:17:03 PM »
Kelley,

This is Daniel I started another thread over in sawing and milling.  You may want to ask your question there and get a better response.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,69509.0.html
Thank the Lord for second chances

Offline Kelly Palmer

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2013, 02:28:34 PM »
How about an Alaskan setup, with a 10' bar?

Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #30 on: October 10, 2013, 07:32:45 PM »
I'd say at least 10, if the bumps are as wide as you say. Probably a couple days work at least.
Manage 80 acre tree farm in central Missouri and Mesquite timber and about a gozillion saguaros in Arizona.

Offline White Ash

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #31 on: October 31, 2013, 08:45:08 PM »
Dry is dry, does not matter how it gets there, as long as there some control

Offline GeneWengert-WoodDoc

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Re: Are kilns Always necessary?
« Reply #32 on: November 02, 2013, 06:54:04 PM »
There are certain things you can do in drying in the kiln that are not good or are good, even though the MC is the same as some other lumber.  The operator's techniques are critical.

A kiln will be faster.
A kiln will go over 133 F, thereby sanitizing the lumber (no insects alive, no viable eggs, no fungi).
A kiln can equalize, getting uniform MC, shell to core, end to end, and piece to piece.
A kiln can relieve drying stress.
A kiln can "set the pitch" by going to 160 F or hotter (give or take)
A kiln can control drying conditions to achieve the highest quality possible--checking, warp, color, etc.

A kiln can over-dry the wood leading to more warp, especially cupping, brittleness and possibly poor gluing.
A kiln can dry the wood at too high a temperature making the wood too brittle and darker in color.
A kiln can dry wet lumber too fast leading to checks.
A kiln can dry too slowly leading to staining.

Bottom line is that the final MC is not a good indicator of quality in any and all drying systems.
Gene - Author of articles in Sawmill & Woodlot and books: Drying Hardwood Lumber; VA Tech Solar Kiln; Sawing Edging & Trimming Hardwood Lumber. And more


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