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Author Topic: Wildlife Food Crops  (Read 2539 times)

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Offline Magicman

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2013, 07:44:19 AM »
Being guilty and being proven guilty are two different things.  Hopefully the officer learned a lesson and will be more thorough with his evidence collecting in the future.
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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2013, 07:55:27 AM »
He might not have the deer, but he did not get a hefty fine for baiting, even though the evidence was not complete enough to prove it beyond a reasonable doubt.  So, he came out OK. 
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Offline chain

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2013, 08:46:20 AM »
Being guilty and being proven guilty are two different things.  Hopefully the officer learned a lesson and will be more thorough with his evidence collecting in the future.

And you might say, "being accused and not being guilty". Many of our wildlife officers today and also Federal agents often accuse  individuals of violations, it's a mind game they play.

Once while pheasant -quail hunting a officer came up and said, "I know you have birds, let's see them." "No," I said,
I haven't even fired a shot" Well let's see your gun and check the mag". As I turned to set my gun down, he punched around in my game bag. Don't think that didn't fire me up.

But the Feds are really pro at that scheme, "circumstantial evidence", they often try to prove.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2013, 09:35:32 AM »
I asked my step son about food plots. If I grow it in the woods,fields I can hunt over it. But I can not carry something in, like apples,and put them under a pine tree and have a pine apple tree.  ;D   I can grow carrots and beets in the woods and put a tree stand by it and hunt over it and be legal. I know the deer like carrots and beets and string beans too. But the string beans would not live because of the frost. I do not hunt and he does not do this. The game warden had  2 people in cuffs on the tar road below me,about 2 weeks ago. Night hunting,or really early morning hunting.
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Offline Claybraker

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #24 on: December 14, 2013, 04:42:22 PM »
In Georgia, you can hunt deer over bait in the southern zone.

Also, it's a common practice for the DNR to donate illegally harvested game to a local food bank. I would suspect Cali does the same.

Apples, if purchased by the bushel, typically won't have bar code stickers on them. The officer may not have been able to articulate his case to your satisfaction, but it's sorta like a rock sitting on a fence post. It's pretty obvious somebody put it there.

Offline Sonofman

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2013, 09:04:27 PM »
South Carolina, at least in the upstate, started allowing deer hunting over baited fields this season. Our acorn production seems to be fairly good, there were almost no pecans due to May rains washing the pollen out of the air.
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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #26 on: December 14, 2013, 09:25:47 PM »
No pecans here this year, either. 
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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2013, 09:46:27 PM »
The Bee keepers this year were complaining about the rains washing out all the pollen. Not a good year for Honey.
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Offline chain

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2013, 11:48:19 PM »
We had a near bumper crop of pecans and many are still on the trees! No crows to knock 'em out. We didn't have near as much rain as you folks down south and SE.

Offline justallan1

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #29 on: December 15, 2013, 09:20:35 AM »

Also, it's a common practice for the DNR to donate illegally harvested game to a local food bank. I would suspect Cali does the same.

I was born and raised pretty close to where the OP is in California and in the late '60's and '70's the confiscated game was given out to the needy. Then someone decided that everything had to be USDA approved or something like that.
In the foster home I lived for a few years we couldn't even eat the eggs from our own chickens nor any game we shot and I'm sure it's the same for anyone on assistance. Believe me, that little rule got ignored! ;D
Where I now live in Montana the game warden and police are pretty good guys and know everyone and may miss a truck with a doe in the back. 8)

Allan

Offline Corley5

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2013, 08:11:50 PM »
We're limited to two gallons of bait here in Michigan.  The apple tree baiting scenario is near and dear to me  ;) ;D :)  Unless I'm actually seen scattering apples under the tree about the only way to prove baiting is a comparison of DNA on the apples and the tree  ;) ;D
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Offline chain

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #31 on: December 16, 2013, 06:51:07 PM »
We had an old fellow that peddled apples by the bushel. I had mentioned baiting with apples, he pointed out the variety[washington I think] I should buy as the apple fragrance was extra strong. The deer ate them all up before the hunt!

During and after this last ice-storm the deer seem to have herded-up  and moved out, possibly to corn feeding fields planted by conservation folks. Not one track did I see in the pecan grove yet, pecans were on the ice.. Don't think deer like that hard ice very much.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2013, 06:01:18 AM »
Corn fields and corn feed piles, when it's winter time, makes the ducks and black birds go crazy. Crazy because they should be well south of here by now. I drove by an unharvested corn field, probably 50 acres separated by a country road, and 100 ducks circling like vultures, -5 F. Then I drive out along a side road (we call cross roads) and see grackles. Hmmm
Move'n on.

Offline Magicman

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #33 on: December 17, 2013, 07:28:31 AM »
Is there a reason that a 50 acre corn field would be unharvested?  Poor crop, uneconomical ??
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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #34 on: December 17, 2013, 10:47:16 AM »
MM
Around here, we have some farmers that just don't get around to picking, and some will just leave for wildlife. Then some are running behind and then get an early snow which slows or stops the picking.

So any that you mention could be it.

Right now, we have snow and there are also bean fields that were not picked. They for sure are lost. Corn will stand for awhile and a poorer yield as the wildlife enjoys a smorgasbord treat.
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Offline Woodcarver

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #35 on: December 17, 2013, 11:22:42 AM »
Farmers in this area have been waiting for the corn to dry.  It's a balancing act.  Pick it wet and spend more money on propane to dry it or wait and expect a reduced yield.  The decision is made with an eye on the price.
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #36 on: December 17, 2013, 02:03:47 PM »
In my area that is silage or fodder corn. It gets put in piles about 10-12 feet deep and packed down and covered with a tarp. Than fed to the cattle.
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Offline Woodcarver

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #37 on: December 17, 2013, 03:21:07 PM »
Most of the corn in this area is harvested as silage and stored in one type of silo or another.  That corn has long since been harvested and the silos are full--or were.  The corn that is standing was planted with the intention of combining it, either for ground feed or for the production of ethanol.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #38 on: December 17, 2013, 04:19:09 PM »
Ahhh, the joys of farming. A local (new) farmer here grew some corn one time, probably a couple hundred acres all on rented ground. Was on dad's old farm he sold actually. They never started cutting until about Christmas and piled it on the floor of a shed. It heated (from respiration) and must have been on the wet side, so it all went moldy. Hauled it all out to dump in January. $100,000 of corn they said. They gave up on the hog farm business a couple years ago and are long gone. All the bigger farmers are getting dryers now. Years ago when dad still farmed, there was no money left after propane drying, and that was before he retired, probably a good 20 years back. So with propane going up and up all the time I can't see those outfits getting enough value added to even break even with them dryers. Propane is way higher in NB than in Iowa.

Like Cfarm said, it's mostly fodder corn. Ethonal ain't even happening on farms here, no subsidies. I think the dryer guys have a market out of province for the corn they dry, it's not for feed if you got to dry it.  I know with regular grain, if it was feed than that meant it wasn't good enough for much else. I can tell ya though, that around here no one is growing crops for wildlife. They sure help themselves, but you'd have to post guard 24 hrs. No one is getting money to let their crops rot or be destroyed by wildlife.
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Re: Wildlife Food Crops
« Reply #39 on: December 17, 2013, 04:21:46 PM »
My understanding is:
In the shorter growing seasons to the North corn doesn't have time to mature, so often it is grown for silage where the crop is cut and chopped green for winter use. Usually needs to be stored where air cannot get to it, such as a silo, a pit, or in bags.
When it cannot be cut at the right green stage and gets too dry to ferment properly, then it is left standing in hopes it can mature and dry for dry storage. Some shelled corn is stored green like in the airtight Harvestor type silos. If this window of harvesting is missed, then the crop stands over the winter in hopes of very little snow for winter picking or later.

And SD, the farmers pay much less for propane to dry crops than those of us that buy it to heat our homes. And I understand that moldy corn can kill hogs if fed to them. Farming isn't for the weak at heart.
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