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Author Topic: Learning about my mill...  (Read 6344 times)

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Offline DanG

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Learning about my mill...
« on: February 04, 2002, 08:56:29 PM »
The past week has been frustrating, since I've had very little time to tinker with the Mobile Dimension mill, or, even to check in on THE ForestryForum.

Saturday, I finally got to spend a few hours at the aforementioned tinkering, and I learned a lot about the mill, and it's history.  I took the guards off, and thoroughly inspected the teeth. I found them to be in pretty good shape, overall. In fact, 5 of the 6 teeth on the main blade were perfect!   They were sharp, but dull in color. The other one, however, was shiney, and showing a bit of wear. It was also of a DIFFERENT type!! >:(   It was a quarter-inch longer than the rest, and was doing ALL of the cutting.  I can't wait to see how it cuts with the 6 new, identical teeth that I installed.
Maintenance has not been a luxury enjoyed by this machine, for a while.  The cooling fins, and oil cooler were completely clogged with oily dust. I had to do a major clean-up, just to find some of the bolts I needed to access.
To it's credit, this machine still runs great, and was cutting decent boards, even with one tooth and a rank amateur at the controls.
I'm going to replace the exhaust system, and spruce up a few other things, before I run it any more, so it will be a couple of weeks before we see any more action.
"I don't feel like an old man.  I feel like a young man who has something wrong with him."  Dick Cavett
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Offline Frank_Pender

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2002, 10:17:54 PM »
Just to let you know, Dan,  I sawed some dimensions I had never sawn before without rolling the log.  I set the new  hydraulic mill up with the 19 1/2" bottom edger blade to cut an order of 8" x 12" timbers.  
They are going to be used for posts and headers for a porch for the new chainsaw shop  being built in town.  The old one had recently burnt down due to children playing around it on a Sunday afternoon with fireworks.  It was quite an experience to make just one pass with the mill and have an 8 x 12 return with four complete sides. 8)  Make sure you keep those cooling fins clear and clean as well as matching teeth for each blade.  It is best the keep the teeth the same dimension  for all three blades.  The best to you in your venture. ;) ;)
Frank Pender

Offline DanG

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2002, 05:10:33 AM »
Thanks, Frank. I'll bet it is a thrill to whack that size in one pass.
You say to keep the same size on all 3 blades? Are you talking about the tooth width, as well. The book calls for 5/16 on the main, and 1/4 on the edgers. :P

BTW, according to MD, my mill was originally shipped with the 19.5" edger, but it now has the 2   12.5"  ones. How hard is it to convert back?  Is it practical to switch back and forth, or is it a major operation to change it?
"I don't feel like an old man.  I feel like a young man who has something wrong with him."  Dick Cavett
"Beat not thy sword into a plowshare, rather beat the sword of thine enemy into a plowshare."

Offline Frank_Pender

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2002, 01:51:45 PM »
  What i meant by size is better said by saying the same amount of wear on the teeth.  You are correct in that the edber blades use  1/4 inch and the main uses 5/16.   When you convert the bottom edger blade over to the 19 1/2 you will use 5/16 on it.  You will use the top edger blade at all when usingthe larger edger blade.   ;)  Make some sawdust and enjoy. 8) 8) 8)
Frank Pender

Offline timberbeast

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2002, 05:17:26 PM »
Never changed mine over,  Dan,  I have the 12.5's.  Best thing to look for on the teeth is rounded edges.  Make sure you grease all the zerks,  and check the manual to find the lube points for the bearings,  and tighten all the bolts on the track,  they do tend to vibrate loose.  Have fun tinkering,  and let us know when the dust flies!! 8)
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline Don P

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2002, 08:16:08 PM »
Hey zerks!
How do you get one of those DanG things out when they break off flush. The axles on my carriage wheels were designed with the zerks poking out where they catch everything, got 3 broken and have just been pumping 90 wt all over the place hoping some lube gets in.
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An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline LeeB

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2002, 02:00:17 AM »
Drill it out with a smal enough bit so as not to damage the threads and then use an ease out.LeeB
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, JD 3032 tractor, JD 5410 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline psychotic1

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2002, 02:44:08 AM »
I would suggest using some thick grease around the drill bit to catch the little pieces.  You DON'T want them gettting into whatever bearing surface you trying to lube.

Bruce
Patience, hell.  I'm gonna kill something

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2002, 11:43:40 AM »
oke, I wuz thinkin wuzza ZERK?? and then it seems like maybe itsa name fora grease fitting thingy?  lw
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline Don P

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2002, 04:57:43 PM »
There ya go ;)  those greasers.
Well I wiped the guides out on my mill yesterday so got the day off to roam the mountain looking for orange fungi today. Jasper and me found a neat rock shelter when it started to rain.
I ordered a few sets of axles when ordering the guides so I can remove the old ones and try the uneasy out in the comfort of the barn. And knowing I got back up for a screw up :D
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An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline timberbeast

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2002, 06:43:17 PM »
Might not have to drill if you use the smallest EZ out.  Someone told me that you can get replacements with wrench flats on them,  like a brake bleeder??  Not sure if it's true,  but sure would solve some problems!  Good luck,  I hate working ON things when I could be working WITH them!
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline Don P

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2002, 07:19:15 PM »
I hear that, ever have one of those weeks where you keep singing that Bob Dylan song "Everything's Broken"? :D
Thanks for all the tips guys, I'm a nail pounder at heart, mechanics comes slow.
A laborer works with his hands
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An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline LeeB

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2002, 11:43:38 PM »
deffinatly can get em witha hex head on them. If you accidently bugger the threads drilling them out, you can also get the knock in ones. LeeB
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, JD 3032 tractor, JD 5410 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2002, 08:50:02 AM »
What kind of guides are you running and how did you wipe them out?

On some older mills, you can use a piece of wood as a guide.  I had a couple of mills like that.   I used a piece of locust.

An oldtimer told me they used to use oil soaked leather as a guide.  They wrapped it around a piece of wood to keep it in place of the holder.
Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

Offline Don P

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2002, 04:54:29 PM »
Oh I'll fess up, It all started with a Humboldt in a sidehill tree that cracked the log ::). Being miserly I was sawing right into the crack ::). Got the alignment off a little bit and sawed a wedge off the tail end about a foot long and 3/4" thick at the wide end ::). I saw it drop on the log side and land on the guide and shut down. My blade goes through a little harmonic shimmy on the wind down and it must have caught and snagged in a gullet. My guides are cast aluminum with oak pins and pop when stressed (which ain't all bad!) By this morning I had a set "rigged", I like the locust idea as I had steel in my patch. By noon I was singing "yipee ti yi yo, rocking to and fro" and laid off some 4/4x17" FAS red oak, life is good. She'll have to patch the rear of my jeans tho, the beast was so big they suffered a blowout :D.
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline Frank_Pender

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2002, 07:54:53 PM »
Confession sure makes a feller feel better in the end, right.
;)  That Humbolt Cut will get a guy every time, or his mill and then his pocket book. :'(
Frank Pender

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2002, 06:00:05 AM »

Quote

There ya go ;)  those greasers.
Well I wiped the guides out on my mill yesterday so got the day off to roam the mountain looking for orange fungi today. Jasper and me found a neat rock shelter when it started to rain.
I ordered a few sets of axles when ordering the guides so I can remove the old ones and try the uneasy out in the comfort of the barn. And knowing I got back up for a screw up :D


  OK so- officially off-topic as per my norm- all zerks aside- what about those orange fungi? This time of year?!..I like going after Auricularia auricula-judae-  aka tree ear, cloud ear, jew's ear, or judas ear. If you eat at Chinese restaurants these are the brown almost transparent bits of fungi that are soft but crunchy and have no taste. I first found some down in WV and then was real happy to see them up here in Maine too..I tend to find them on deadwood- most often hardwood- usually cherry, maybe a few others. First time you find them you see instantly why they call them 'tree ears'. That's JUST what they look like- little and curved, much like the article when cooked. They dry and keep very well.

  I have seen and orange type of this but have no clue as to edibility and wondered if that was what you were describing.
 
  Now back to the mill and the topic at hand..lw  
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline Don P

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2002, 11:10:13 AM »
Well I found some canker but to be honest I couldn't find leaves in the snow to positively ID that I was on a chestnut...no orange fungi but then it might be the wrong time for fruiting bodies...if thats what that is? Will try in the SP next time I go over. I know the orange stuff you're talking about and I think its different...have to get a side by side and let you do an ID.
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline Trc^

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2002, 07:06:39 PM »
Hey don .. you find that zerk tool when ya went down the mountain .. was wonderin if ya had.

Way back when .. when i was mechanicin out in the oil patch .. the bearin supply house give me a couple every month or so .. but then .. seems like everybody tried raidin my tool box for those darn things ... lol

Offline Don P

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Re: Learning about my mill...
« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2002, 08:39:58 PM »
Well, it was one of those trips that started with all the best intentions. The old Dodge was sheduled in to have the cab sheet metal work done outside of Charlotte. By the time I finished with my wrong turn, I seem to make it every time but there's a BBQ place down there so its not a total loss. And then went on to the shop and admired everybody else's and got mine all situated, and one thing led to another and along about a little while later I was bouncing home in the dark again:D.
Thanks for the tip, there is a Dixie Bearings down there, I'll be back down there soon. I did get new axles in so there's time to play with the old ones. I'll either get good at removing them or figure a way to protect them.
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart


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