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Forestry and Logging / Re: Aloha

« Last post by Riwaka on Today at 06:50:14 PM »
US$1 per lb for a used dangle head processor is like what the repaint in a processor head rebuild is likely to cost.

There are used processor heads around that can fell, delimb and debark eucalyptus or used processors that can be converted to debark eucalyptus. Simple processors with no measuring system up to more complex ones with full linked in electronic measuring/ tally etc.
(Used heads I have seen recently have 20-30 ton machine base requirements, 16 inch up to 22 inch diameter wood)

Shipping - probably something going to rimpac for an oahu drop off.

Labour - see if any skilled loggers are doing the Ironman at Kona and incorporate logging into their pre-event training program. 

Biodiesel for power generation
Hawaiian Electric seeks biofuel for Oahu power plants | Hawaiian Electric
Home - Pacific Biodiesel

Biomass on Kaua'i for power generation.
Biomass | Kauai Island Utility Cooperative   (Kauai woodchips for power)

Smaller version of a boarbuster trap for the wild hogs?



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Forestry and Logging / Re: Help needed with mulching tooth ID

« Last post by gvbrush on Today at 06:38:38 PM »
Thanks for the reply NativeWolf. We love our CAT branded FAE heads too. I don't think any FAE tooth would fit this Fecon FGT head, so they probably wouldn't help. We chew up a lot of limestone and sandstone with no problems, but the flint rock, creek quartz, and other super hard rock here breaks carbide tips on a regular basis.
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Ask The Forester / Huge stump reduction

« Last post by Tmacmullin on Today at 06:32:03 PM »

I have a 40” diameter hard wood stump that I need to extract from the ground. I know that even if I successfully sever all the peripheral roots that my Bobcat E50 (maximum lifting capacity of 6000 lbs) will not be able to lift that stump in its entirety into my dump truck. So before I sever the side roots I was thinking I could use my newly purchased serrated ripper to “cut” through the core stump into at least 4 separate pieces then sever the side roots and subsequently hoist each quarter into my truck, after removing as much dirt from the stump quarters as possible.
Do you think the use of the serrated ripper will be a good substitute for a chainsaw in this case?

My other alternate thought is to rip free the entire stump and then use a high-pressure washer to “clean” the stump as much as possible then use a chainsaw with a 3’ bar and quarter the stump accordingly!

What’s your thought?
Btw this stump was recently a live tree brought down by storms last month here in the Boston area. The owner thinks the tree was either a silver maple or a silver oak! So hard, non-rotten Wood is what I have to deal with!
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Whatcha Sawin' ???

« Last post by Magicman on Today at 06:21:03 PM »
Yup, that log was heavy and we wanted as much lift as we could get to keep it above the angle iron on the back of the trailer.  That log was to be bucked into a 4' and two 6' sections so the thinner 4' came off first which let it down to the ground.  :)
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Silvatech Setworks

« Last post by Ron Wenrich on Today at 06:16:22 PM »
Its been a long time since I worked with a Silvatech.  But, it sounds like you may have a short or a bare wire someplace.  These are the things that can drive you crazy.

If it is only on the last cut, you could simply erase your stack and put it for the target size, then set.  That should pull you up to your desired size and leave you with a lot less heartburn.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Aggravations of a portable sawyer

« Last post by slider on Today at 06:14:31 PM »
Repeat well said MM.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Whatcha Sawin' ???

« Last post by WV Sawmiller on Today at 06:14:18 PM »
Lynn,

   I have often tied (Cable actually) a log to a tree and driven out from under it but my question is why your chain is tied so high on the tree? Is it to keep from hanging on the rear of the trailer or something?  Looks to me like it would be hard to loosen the chain once the log is off the trailer. I know I am probably missing something in the overall hook up.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Aggravations of a portable sawyer

« Last post by 711ac on Today at 06:08:25 PM »
Thanks magicman & Ted, not being a sawyer I did not understand these points.
We all work by the hour one way or another.
Peter I think you took my question the wrong way. No big deal  smiley_beertoast
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Aggravations of a portable sawyer

« Last post by SawyerTed on Today at 06:01:18 PM »
Maybe you should negotiate an hourly rate for the timbers and a board foot rate for the lumber.  It might make you feel better.

But I think you will find the cost is about equal either way.  The costs of operating are the same, no matter what formula one uses to cover costs. The rate a sawyer uses changes the impetus for efficient operations - an hourly rate places efficiency on the owner of the logs, a board foot rate places efficiency on the sawyer.  

Making a timber that will likely dry straight isn't just 4 cuts and it does take somewhat different skill, knowledge and experience than plain sawing boards.  While ideally a cant prior to cutting into square edged boards would make a timber, it isn't always the case-wane, sapwood, knots etc impact the the quality of the timber possibly more than a the same cant sawn into boards.  That's the hidden knowledge and skill Magicman is saying that the sawyer brings with him.  There's value in that knowledge and skill.
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Ask The Forester / Re: Question for an Old Forester

« Last post by Ron Scott on Today at 06:00:04 PM »
I agree . Such mounds and depressions are a ecological land type phase (ELTP) caused by changing soil types, water table changes often creating vernal ponds, and particularly wind thrown trees leaving root mounds after the wood has decayed over time. Such landscapes are subject to wind throw.

The resulting "cradle knolls" are described as the pit and mound micro topography formed as a result of tree uprooting and its attendant displacement of soil. 

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Sawmills and Milling / Re: General Woodmizer Questions

« Last post by firefighter ontheside on Today at 05:57:05 PM »
I would only be worried about older Diesel engines that were not designed for ULSD.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Saw shed and barn swallows....

« Last post by slider on Today at 05:54:08 PM »
They tend to want to nest in my tool box if i leave the lid open . I just can't deal with that.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Saw shed and barn swallows....

« Last post by Peter Drouin on Today at 05:39:16 PM »
There only there to do the egg thing then gone, Never a problem here.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: How to approach loggers?

« Last post by Peter Drouin on Today at 05:32:05 PM »
I recommend approaching loggers very carefully. Make a lot of noise, maybe wear a bear bell. Try not to spook them.  :D An offering of coffee and donuts can entice them as well.




 :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D Good one.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Aggravations of a portable sawyer

« Last post by Peter Drouin on Today at 05:29:46 PM »
It's all work, Do you pay extra when the sawer has to start his chainsaw?
The same thing if you put in rotten logs in the pile, will you pay for that too?
When I had a customer try to bring me down my already talked about price. I would just tell them, Ok, how about $100.00 an hour to start. 
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: How to approach loggers?

« Last post by Dave Shepard on Today at 05:28:38 PM »
I recommend approaching loggers very carefully. Make a lot of noise, maybe wear a bear bell. Try not to spook them.  :D An offering of coffee and donuts can entice them as well.

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Timber Framing/Log construction / Re: Greenhouse frame

« Last post by red on Today at 05:28:04 PM »
That's a Greenhouse Building
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Aggravations of a portable sawyer

« Last post by CCCLLC on Today at 05:24:52 PM »
Very well said MM.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Aggravations of a portable sawyer

« Last post by Magicman on Today at 05:14:06 PM »
It's not the ribbon that you pay for, it knowing how to tie it.  (old saying but very true)

Reading the log and setting it up for sawing takes experience that you never see.  Sometimes extra trim cuts must be made to avoid wane.  Handling and turning the timbers without damaging (knocking the corners off) takes extra time and skill.  In actuality there is seldom much time difference between sawing lumber or timbers.  For me, the price is the same.
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Sawmills and Milling / Re: Whatcha Sawin' ???

« Last post by Magicman on Today at 05:05:10 PM »
A couple of years ago I sawed a Sinker Cypress job for a customer.  At the time she told me that I was welcome to the cutoffs that were piled after the logs were bucked to length.  Well yesterday I sawed a job in the area so I drove by the location to see that the Cypress ends were still there. 

 



"Yup, still there" so I called the customer to verify that I could still get them.  "Yes", so I told her that I could get them this morning.

 

The first one that we recovered.

 

We didn't know what another would do when we loaded it so we hauled these two in and unloaded.

 

This one is pecky.  :)

 

Marty is adjusting as I am winching.

 

We are crosshauling (parbuckle) this bad boy up the ramps.

 

To unload we chained it to a tree.

 

And drove the trailer out from under it.

 

Marty watches as I winch a shortie up the ramps.

 

10 "logs" of varying degrees of value hauled and unloaded.

 

Another view.  ;D 

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