The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: Mesquite cutter on January 10, 2020, 01:17:41 AM

Title: Saw Mills
Post by: Mesquite cutter on January 10, 2020, 01:17:41 AM
Okay I am considering buying a sawmill.  I have been considering Woodland Mills, Wood-Mizer and Timber King.   There is quite a bit of price difference in these three brands.  From your experience what is your opinion on these three sawmill brands?  Thanks
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: SawyerTed on January 10, 2020, 08:47:54 AM
An important question, what are you trying to accomplish with the mill?

You didnít say what models you are considering.  You will need to compare similar machines.

All three manufacturers you list build sawmills that make quality lumber.  
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: WV Sawmiller on January 10, 2020, 08:49:46 AM
   I think you will be well pleased with the quality and service support from any of the 3 you mention as well as several other name brand (sponsors here on the FF). Just compare the features and see what you must have and can afford for your needs and if possible go observe and maybe run the mill you are most interested in.

    I can't give you a recommendation because I am biased. :D
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: frazman on January 10, 2020, 09:11:24 AM
If you haven't seen it yet, Woodland Mills have come up with there 10th anniversary mills on all three models. I just purchased the HM 126 in November but seeing what they have to offer now, I would have have purchased the 2020 models...
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Mesquite cutter on January 11, 2020, 01:18:46 AM
I am considering getting a mobile sawmill and maybe have a max cut of 28 inches or so.   I am just not sure which one to go with.  
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: thecfarm on January 11, 2020, 06:13:08 AM
Welcome to the forum. Going to be sawing for others a lot? You will want/need hyds. 
I only saw for myself so I can get by with a manual mill. A manual is a lot of work and time.
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: YellowHammer on January 11, 2020, 07:02:12 AM
If I was going to do mobile sawing, or even moderate quantity stationary sawing, and having owned three Woodmizer mills, I would go with one in the LT40-LT50 range.  They are a well proven design, rugged workhorses, produce a lot of accurate lumber, and have all the bells and whistles needed to grow your business if you desire.  They also have incredible resale value and will sell within a couple weeks if you want to get out of them.  
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Southside on January 11, 2020, 07:04:00 AM
Woos inertia mills


Eh?  I think you need to spend less time in your new walnut steam chamber.  Things are getting mushy. :D
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Mesquite cutter on January 11, 2020, 07:12:23 AM
Welcome to the forum. Going to be sawing for others a lot? You will want/need hyds.
I only saw for myself so I can get by with a manual mill. A manual is a lot of work and time.
That is one of questions that I cannot get myself to answer.  I am thinking of sawing slabs and trying to sell some of them.   I noticed that the Woodland Mills brand is quite a bit cheaper in price. (like 4K).  The engine is quite a bit smaller but would 14 horsepower be enough.  I like that fact that it has a wide cutting throat.  I will not be milling logs that wide but many mesquite logs are not very straight.  It may be what I am looking for in milling crooked logs.   I like the price too.   Any of you have experience with Woodland Mills.  I am looking at Norwood also.  It seems like a solid mill.   I will entertain your biased and unbiased opinions. 
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Mesquite cutter on January 12, 2020, 02:01:45 AM
I was looking at the TimberKing sawmill.  The welded bedframe seems like a good option in comparison to other bedframes from other sawmills that are bolted together.   I guess I could aslo weld the bedframe together once it is bolted together.  
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Haleiwa on January 12, 2020, 04:19:59 AM
Mesquite is hard and has a lot of directions to the grain.   You will need plenty of power to saw it.  I don't think you will be happy with 14 horsepower. 
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Mesquite cutter on January 12, 2020, 07:52:11 AM
Thanks for the advise.  Most of what I have is mesquite, live oak and Texas Ebony.  I think it will be the wood-mizer or the Timberking.  
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: ladylake on January 12, 2020, 08:38:57 AM
 
 More power the better, get some 4į blades right away for tough wood.. They also saw easy wood great.   Steve
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: WV Sawmiller on January 12, 2020, 08:44:01 AM
I was looking at the TimberKing sawmill.  The welded bedframe seems like a good option in comparison to other bedframes from other sawmills that are bolted together.   I guess I could aslo weld the bedframe together once it is bolted together.  
   My WM frame is welded. I can't say about the smaller model mills but mine
 is welded.

Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: GAB on January 12, 2020, 09:07:11 AM
@Mesquite cutter (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=48494) 
Sawmills are somewhat like footwear, different configurations for different occasions.
If you had a wide head Wood-mizer LT-50, a Lucas with the widest or longest slabber bar available, and a small mill 
like a Woodland 126, or a Wood-mizer LT-15 or other small mills available for the small stuff you'd be pretty well set.
GAB
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: AnthonyW on January 12, 2020, 09:12:15 AM
Let me put it this way. Based on all of the information and posts on here about the Wood-Mizer support. I just recently considered purchasing an 1987 LT30 that has the powered head and drive (my LT25 is manual on both). It has been sitting for 10 years and would need to be completely stripped, sandblasted, repainted, rebuilt, etc. I ONLY considered this because it was/is a Wood-Mizer.

P.S. Before I could make a reasonable offer ($1000-1500, asking $6500) the machine sold.
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: jeepcj779 on January 12, 2020, 12:51:38 PM
If you plan to do mostly slabbing, and don't regularly need dimensional lumber larger than 2x8 (x 7 7/8 to be exact), you might take a look at the Lucas 7-23 and a slabbing attachment. You can get the mill, slabbing attachment, and a planer attachment for just over $15K. This setup allows for cutting dimensional lumber up to 7 7/8 x 7 7/8 without having to turn the power head. If you need something bigger, you can urn the power head a cut boards/beams over 15". The slabber attachment can do slabs up to 60" wide, and you can use the planer head to put on a better finish. I think this setup gets you a lot of bang for your buck.
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: YellowHammer on January 12, 2020, 01:01:39 PM
WM mills are welded and very strong.  Even the LT15 is welded except where the sections join.

The LT40 truss style bed design will not permanently bend with anything less than a 95 hp, 4WD tractor pulling on it.   :D
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: jeepcj779 on January 12, 2020, 01:32:11 PM
Sounds like there might be a good story behind that comment...
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Mesquite cutter on January 13, 2020, 12:30:59 AM
If you plan to do mostly slabbing, and don't regularly need dimensional lumber larger than 2x8 (x 7 7/8 to be exact), you might take a look at the Lucas 7-23 and a slabbing attachment. You can get the mill, slabbing attachment, and a planer attachment for just over $15K. This setup allows for cutting dimensional lumber up to 7 7/8 x 7 7/8 without having to turn the power head. If you need something bigger, you can urn the power head a cut boards/beams over 15". The slabber attachment can do slabs up to 60" wide, and you can use the planer head to put on a better finish. I think this setup gets you a lot of bang for your buck.
What I do not like about the slabbing attachment is that it uses a chainsaw chain for slabbing.  I figure after four slabs I am turning an inch of wood into saw dust.  That is a lot of sawdust after several logs when you want to cut thin slabs.
Title: Re: Saw Mills
Post by: Ianab on January 13, 2020, 02:24:39 AM



Fair enough, I don't think it would be the right mill for you either. Chainsaw slabbers come into their own on the really BIG logs. A band mill that can handle a 5 ft dia log is neither cheap nor portable.  If you are looking at slabbing logs under 28". then a bandsaw makes sense. And if you primarily want to cut slabs, then you probably don't NEED the power options, as long as you have some way to move logs and slabs, like a tractor / forklift etc. 
I do agree that mesquite, being one of the harder woods, you want a bit more power, and blade selection is important.