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Author Topic: Old Barn  (Read 614 times)

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Offline Saltwaterspirit

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Old Barn
« on: January 13, 2021, 08:24:36 PM »
Hey everyone I’m new to the forum, I have been working on an old out building/barn.  I am on the fence about cleaning the wood inside, or sanding/using a restorer type tool.  I would like to get some of the dingyness out of the building without sacrificing the character. Still trying to figure out how to post pictures to see.


Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2021, 09:06:36 PM »
Are the timbers softwood or hardwood?  Is this being converted to living space or?

I'm assuming you're talking about the Porter Cable Restorer tool.  I have a couple of the Makita wheel brush sander tools, which appear to be similar.  I use an abrasive nylon bristle wheel on mine and on hardwood they work great!  They remove dirt but do not remove wood and leave a great looking old look just without the dirt and dinginess.

How it would work on softwood I do not know, never tried it.  I know that you DO NOT want to use a wire wheel or scotchbrite type wheel for this or a flap sanding wheel.  If you try anything it should be the nylon abrasive bristle.  To test this, you can buy a drill attachment of the same nylon abrasive bristle.  Although it would be painfully slow for timbers, I keep them on hand for detail work.  Buy a 
Nyalox Wheel Brush 4-Inch Orange
 
Amazon has them.  Once in awhile a hardware store will have them, but you could waste a lot of time running around.  If this wheel does what you want, then the Porter Cable Restorer with this wheel should work.


 
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Offline Don P

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2021, 09:52:55 PM »
Along the same lines I've used an Osborne brush, a 4" cup type brush with abrasive coated nylon bristles that works well. Some of the log home supply companies carry it. I had a machinist friend make an adapter so I could use it with a 1/2" right angle drill.
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Offline Walnut Beast

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2021, 11:06:19 PM »
Pressure soda blast it. Or walnut shells 

Offline low_48

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2021, 11:30:25 PM »
By dinginess, are we talking manure? I'd probably start with a wide nozzle electric pressure washer. Not the super power like a gas powered pressure washer, so better on wood. It would help a lot if you mentioned the square footage needed to be cleaned. 

Offline Chuck White

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 07:44:31 AM »
Welcome to the Forestry Forum, Saltwaterspirit!
~Chuck~
Retired USAF 1989, Retired School Bus Driver 2012, now semi-retired Mobile Sawyer, 2018 Silverado 4X4
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG25 Kohler - Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener and single-tooth setter, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain a Wood-Mizer

Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 08:39:10 AM »
Somewhere between pressure washing and sand blasting will really clean wood.  Anyone here ever put a wire wheel on a weed wacker?

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #7 on: Yesterday at 10:15:53 AM »
Not yet but the cup wheels intrigue me. 
Revelation 3:20

Offline Thomasjw4

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #8 on: Yesterday at 11:32:42 AM »
For old barnwood, i used a handheld wire brush and a quick swipe with a belt sander.  that would take a LONG time with a large beam though 

Offline Bandmill Bandit

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 11:38:42 AM »
You'll want to do this on a scrap to get the hang of it. I use a industrial angle/side grinder with a very course wire cup brush. Its quick and effective BUT you can ruin a piece real quick too.

I've tried about every other method mentioned above and a few others but this is the cheapest, quickest and give you the most control over the result.

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Offline Walnut Beast

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 03:25:44 PM »
Ive got one of those cup wheels and I definitely wouldnt use on barn wood 

Offline Walnut Beast

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 03:31:02 PM »
For old barnwood, i used a handheld wire brush and a quick swipe with a belt sander.  that would take a LONG time with a large beam though
Thats the next best thing besides power washing with various tips and sandblasting with various media. A heavy duty extension pole with a steel brush head works good 

Online Tom King

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #12 on: Yesterday at 03:31:21 PM »
I have a pressure washer that's 2500 psi at 4.4 gpm.  If you're careful which nozzle you use, it won't erode wood.  I use it every year on painted 18th, and 19th Century museum houses. It also gets used on the bare wood in our barn, to clean the stall walls.  More than 2500 is too much.

If that's too much, which shouldn't be for a barn, CO2 blasting.

A Foam Cannon, used on a pressure washer for washing cars, will shoot a thick layer of soap foam on old, dirty wood, which lets it work on the dirt much longer before it dries out, and then rinse with the pressure washer.  The special soap they sell with those works on this type of dirt too.  The soap helps break down the dirt, so it doesn't take so much pressure to wash it off.



edited to add:  You may have to scrub the dirt with a stiff Tampico bristle, long handled brush like an acid washing brush for bricks, before rinsing it off.  You can find them with the masonry tools in box stores.

Offline Walnut Beast

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #13 on: Yesterday at 03:38:36 PM »
They make various wire wheels for a drill that give more. Like a steel brush pipe cleaner type for example. Depends how much time you want to spend doing it😂

Offline Walnut Beast

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #14 on: Yesterday at 03:50:39 PM »
I have a pressure washer that's 2500 psi at 4.4 gpm.  If you're careful which nozzle you use, it won't erode wood.  I use it every year on painted 18th, and 19th Century museum houses. It also gets used on the bare wood in our barn, to clean the stall walls.  More than 2500 is too much.

If that's too much, which shouldn't be for a barn, CO2 blasting.

A Foam Cannon, used on a pressure washer for washing cars, will shoot a thick layer of soap foam on old, dirty wood, which lets it work on the dirt much longer before it dries out, and then rinse with the pressure washer.  The special soap they sell with those works on this type of dirt too.  The soap helps break down the dirt, so it doesn't take so much pressure to wash it off.


Yes sir. If you have painted several houses you figure the best way to do it. I cleaned many houses with a hotsy pressure washer. As Tom said be careful with the tip. I used the roto tip because I was getting off many coats of paint that was coming off. That tip was loud and aggressive and effective on a 8 extension but it could tear up wood if you didnt know what you were doing 

Offline Don P

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #15 on: Yesterday at 05:00:18 PM »
Not yet but the cup wheels intrigue me.
Here it is Mike. I saw wallyworld had them as well so clicked the link, double the price  ::).
Osborn 4" Round Abrasive Cup Brush | Twin Creeks (twincreeksloghomes.com)
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #16 on: Yesterday at 07:05:24 PM »
Personally as far as speed and cleanliness goes, I would pick the pressure washer if it fits your situation. My son has one client with a fairly large estate, a large log cabin main binding from the 40's and many decks and stairs all around. Every spring he has to pressure wash all the wood because of the pollen issues in a EWP grove. There is enough wood to keep 1 man busy for 3 days just on the pressure washing, plus all the bluestone paths around the house and pool, then is is the grounds cleanup, tree trimming, flower boxes to fill (about 40) and a million other things. It's all hands on deck for his little company for that one. Anyway, sometimes I help.
 They use a low pressure nozzle to mix and spray on a soap solution, then higher pressure for cleaning and you do have to get a feel for it especially if you are not stripping, but man it does a great job. We did my deck this year (not done in 34 years) and stripped it to bare wood then treated. Worked like a charm.  ;D :)
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Offline Mooseherder

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Re: Old Barn
« Reply #17 on: Yesterday at 07:37:55 PM »
I'd be trying some good ole American bleach in a sprayer first.  Then an electric pressure washer with soap already mentioned.   Beam planer or sander option in other spots if necessary.  I wish we had a barn like that.  Good for you. ;)
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