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Author Topic: crop trees  (Read 4713 times)

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Offline Curtis Koth

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crop trees
« on: November 02, 2000, 07:20:35 PM »
i am having difficulty choosing crop trees in my 7 acre oak-hickory woodlot. i have read in literature it is easier when they are fully leafed out to look for healthy crowns. i live in an area surrounded by wetlands, so the bugs eat me alive in the summer. can i just look for crowns with no apparent dead branches and go from there?
I plan on harvesting about 10 trees to be made into flooring this winter to start.
thanks for any input, Curt

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2000, 05:03:01 PM »
I assume that you have determined the objectives for your crop trees, timber, wildlife, aesthetics etc. It is usually easier to see the area of the tree crowns during leaf on, but crown area examination can be done during leaf off as you suggest. Select your best formed trees by species and value to meet your objectives. To determine which trees must be removed to release a selected crop tree, simply look up into the crop tree crown and envision it divided into four seperate quadrants or sides. Evaluate each of these four sides for interference from neighboring tree crowns. A crop tree that has only one or two feet between its crown and a neighboring crown is not free to grow in that quadrant. If there is doubt about where an adjacent tree is touching and competing with the crop tree, cut it. A crown-touching release essentially involves removal of all trees with crowns that interfere with, or touch, the crop tree. Crop tree release is simply the selection and release of desireable trees or any tree that the landowner wants to retain by removing adjacent competing trees. Selection and release can be done during leaf on or leaf off depending upon ones knowledege and selection skills.
~Ron

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2000, 05:45:27 PM »
For another look at crop trees try http://www.execpc.com/~tmbrgrn/page11.html

Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

Offline Curtis Koth

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2000, 04:26:04 AM »
Thanks for the input guys, my objective is more for crop trees rather than wildlife, which is abundant around here, plenty of wetland, open field and wooded areas.
I have read "croptree management in eastern hardwoods" by the forest service, and believe i understand crown release and tree selection, but what about understory trees near crop trees. I had my county extension agent out recently, and we talked about keeping trunks 6' away plus 1' for every inch in diameter. Was this referring to the understory? I have lots of black cherry about 2" diameter in some areas of the understory, and others species from 4" to 8".
Thanks, Curt
Thanks, Curt

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2000, 04:20:26 PM »
I just checked the reference to the '1/3, 1/3' webpage. Again I find myself with a limited tree 'vocabulary' based on what they do up here with pine; growing it close to encourage self-pruning of the lower branches. From the comments on hardwood spacing and pruning, I take it that techniques is not so good on other species than pine.             LW
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2000, 05:46:28 PM »
It sounds like you may have a good understory, especially in black cherry. As you release your crop trees your understory trees will also develop. Just remove the low quality understory trees and those competing in any significant way with your selected overstory crop trees. Complete a weeding as such in the understory and manage your stand as a two age or multi-aged stand through selective management. You can also work to select future crop trees in the understory. The younger understory trees should reach the same height as your older trees. You have a good source of information in the USDA-Forest Service publication "Crop Tree Managementin Eastern Hardwoods" NA-TP-19-93. I sound like you are on the right track.  
~Ron

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2000, 07:48:32 AM »
Pine will still require room for crown expansion.  It doesn't need as much as the hardwoods.

There is a thing called stocking levels.  It is called the basal area, which can be computed by using an angle gauge.  I wrote an article about cruising and point sampling over on About.com in the forestry section.  You'll find it at:  http://www.forestry.about.com/science/forestry/library/weekly/aa121398.htm  It's a 3 part series.

Stocking levels for hardwoods are between 70-120 for fully stocked stands.  Pines can range from 120-180.  The upper ranges are for the higher diameter stands.

Falling below these stocking levels will mean you have an understocked stand.  Note:  all trees count, no matter what the diameter or specie.  To fully utilize your stand, you should have it stocked with good quality and desirable species.  

Going below these stockings may have a quality impact on the residual trees.  Too much sunlight will cause epicormic branching on most hardwoods.  This leads to defect in lumber and veneer.  It is OK to go down to lower levels if you are doing seedtree or possibly shelterwood cuttings, where reproduction is desired.  It is not desirable for thinnings to go too low.


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Offline Ron Scott

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2000, 10:07:48 AM »
Well said. One needs to keep the appropriate stocking levels in mind. Inventorying and marking strictly for crop tree release is different from marking to a specific basal area. If too many trees are cut to release a small number of crop trees you will affect the appropriate stocking level for the particular species making up the timber stand. It is best to use a combination of both in commercial timber stands. Selective mark trees to the appropriate stocking level (basal area) and also select crop trees to be released within the appropriate stocking level. Again it depends upon the landowner's objectives for the stand, quality and quantity of timber, if the work can be done commercially or non-commercially, etc.
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2000, 08:55:01 AM »
The new publication "Crop Tree Release in Precommercial Hardwood Stands" might also be of some interest on the subject. It's available free of charge from:
David C. Merker
University of Tennessee Agricultural Extension Service
email: demercker@uk.edu
phone: (901) 425-4703
~Ron

Offline Forester Frank

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2000, 05:30:40 PM »
Ron:

Good information. I just sent for the publication. Thanks!

Forester Frank
Forester Frank

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2000, 04:09:19 PM »
The latest issue (Number 20; September 2000) of "Forest Management Update" published by the Northeastern Area; State & Private Forestry; USDA Forest Service has an article titled "A Decade at a Crop Tree Demonstration Area"; by Arlyn Perkey and Amy Onken which might be of some interest. Again it shows that forests produce more benefits when they are managed.
~Ron

treefarmer

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2001, 10:06:16 AM »
I tried to order the publication on crop tree release and got the message the address is incorrect.
the  part  "UK" implies the address is i n  Great Britain and not in Kentucky.  Commment?
I would like the publication.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: crop trees
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2001, 11:39:04 AM »
Mailing address is:

Mr. Arlyn Perkey
USDA Forest Service
180 Canfield street
Morgantown, WV 26505

(304)285-1542

http://www.fs.us/na/morgantown/frm/perkey/fmu/fmutoc.htm
~Ron


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